March 22nd, 2018


You Don't Have to Like Donald Trump to Acknowledge the Obvious ...

 Bernard Goldberg

By Bernard Goldberg

Published Dec. 26, 2017

 You Don't Have to Like Donald Trump to Acknowledge the Obvious ...

The stock market is booming. Consumer confidence is soaring. The unemployment rate is falling. The economy is getting more robust every day. And President Trump's approval ratings have just hit a new low.

Congratulations Mr. Trump. You are the president of your loyal base whose members still adore you and think you walk on water. The bad news, Mr. President, is that almost no one else does.

According to a CNN poll, only 35 percent of Americans approve of the way the president is handling his job. Fifty-nine percent disapprove. And in case you think CNN is out to get the president and actually rigged the poll numbers, the average of all major polls compiled by Real Clear Politics isn’t much better, where his favorable rating is just 38,5 percent and his unfavorable rating is about 57 percent.

The CNN poll was taken before Congress passed the new tax law, so he may get a bump in the next round of polls. But it's unlikely to be more than just a bump. The economy is already doing well — and that hasn't done much for his approval numbers.

So what's going on? With the economy doing so well, why isn’t he doing better? I'm not exactly going out on a limb to suggest his low approval numbers have a lot to do with his tweeting, his bluster, his pettiness and a lot more. In short, a lot of Americans think he's temperamentally unfit for office.

But you don't have to admire this president, or even like him, to acknowledge the obvious: that more than a few journalists — like most other liberal Democrats –won't rest until he's out of office.

President Trump thinks they just make stuff up to hurt him — or at least that's what he says. Who knows if he actually believes it. His loyal base believes it and that may be all he needs to keep the "fake news" narrative going.

But here's another explanation: Contrary to popular belief, journalists are only human and so from time to time they make mistakes.

But mistakes, if that’s what they really are and not something more nefarious, should go in both directions. Funny, but when reporters make mistakes about this president they all seem to go in just one direction — the anti-Trump direction.

If these were simply honest errors, some of them, just by chance, would help the president. But they don't. So what should we make of it?

To say journalists have a liberal bias and detest this president isn't exactly breaking news. When it comes to Donald Trump, a lot of journalists figure if the sun rose in the east this morning, he must have done something wrong and they're going to prove it. So they let their journalistic instincts lapse; they let their guardrails down. Instead of being skeptics, they become gullible patsies, taking in all sorts of later discredited information peddled by anonymous sources — as long as it makes the president look bad.

They put out false information about collusion with the Russians, for example, because that's what they want to believe — that he conspired with his pal Vladimir Putin to rig the election. Collusion, after all, could lead to impeachment, their holy grail.

And if, heaven forbid, you criticize them for sloppiness or for going overboard, you're accused to being a Trump sycophant who wants to put a stake through the heart of the First Amendment and democracy itself.

But how would these same journalists respond if it were Barack Obama or President Hillary Clinton who was under investigation by a special prosecutor who loaded up his team with Republican campaign donors? How would they react if a lead FBI investigator tweeted to his mistress that candidate Clinton is “a [expletive] idiot" and that they needed an "insurance policy" in case she somehow won the election?

We know how they'd react: They'd say the deck was stacked against the Democrat. They'd be outraged. And rightly so.

Yes, Donald Trump, with his egocentricities, his thin skin, his unnecessary quarrels with critics, and a lot more, gives the media plenty of ammunition to use against him. It's as if he's saying, "I just loaded the gun for you; here it is; ready, aim, shoot me."

Still, there are times when I wonder why he wastes so much time and energy beating up on the press when, thanks to their not so hidden contempt for him, they do such a good job beating up on themselves.

JWR contributor Bernard Goldberg, the television news reporter and author of several bestselling books, among them, Bias, a New York Times number one bestseller about how the media distort the news. He is widely seen as one of the most original writers and thinkers in broadcast journalism. Mr. Goldberg covered stories all over the world for CBS News and has won 10 Emmy awards for excellence in journalism. He now reports for the widely acclaimed HBO broadcast Real Sports.

He is a graduate of Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey and a member of the school's Hall of Distinguished Alumni and proprietor of