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November 22nd, 2017

Worth Considering?

Are Jews the Only Ones Who Need a Thick Skin?

David Suissa

By David Suissa

Published Nov. 13, 2017

Are Jews the Only Ones Who Need a Thick Skin?
Why would Larry David stride up so confidently on the "Saturday Night Live" stage and joke about picking up women in a Nazi concentration camp? And why would he wallow in the fact that many of the recently accused sexual aggressors have Jewish names? Hasn't he heard about anti-Semitism?

Here's my theory: He assumes Jews can take it. At a time when everyone is allowed to get offended by the smallest slight, Jews are supposed to be, well, different.

College students can get offended by an email about Halloween costumes, but Jews should handle gross jokes about the Holocaust. Any student can yell about a micro-aggression, but Jews are expected to handle macro-aggressions.

Maybe David figured Jews are on another level. We're the chosen ones, right? We're the sophisticated Americans obsessed with education and with being loved by gentiles. Who has endeared the Jews to America? It's not the lawyers, believe me. It's the comedians.

For more than a century, from Burns to Benny to Allen to Crystal to Seinfeld, we've made America laugh by poking fun at ourselves. And why not? When you've been persecuted for 2,000 years and you finally find a place that accepts you, what better way to show your gratitude than by being entertaining?

And Larry David surely is an entertainer. "Curb Your Enthusiasm" is my all-time favorite comedy. I love, among other things, that there's no laugh track. No one cares whether I laugh or not. I get to eavesdrop on a wacko who obsesses over stuff that makes me squirm.

That's the key word - eavesdrop.

As David was using the Holocaust to try to make me laugh, I wasn't eavesdropping at all. I was looking straight into the eyes of a stand-up comic. This was not the David of "Curb" who was oblivious to my presence and just going about his crazy business. This was a guy who was pushing my buttons, who wanted something from me.

One of the extraordinary things about "Curb" is David's ability to break virtually all taboos. I've often watched an episode and thought, "I can't believe he's pulling this off." He's poked fun at African-Americans, people with disabilities, Palestinian Muslims, and, yes, even Holocaust survivors, and, somehow, he pulls it off.

His mistake last Saturday night was a professional one - he overlooked the context. What works in his "Curb" bubble doesn't necessarily work under the bright lights of a live stage. The sacred cows he could slay on "Curb" ambushed him on stage.

The funny thing is, until he brought up the Holocaust, he seemed to understand those limitations. His act was quite funny. It's only when he veered into the excruciatingly sensitive subject of a Nazi concentration camp that he blew it.

As Rabbi David Wolpe tweeted, David was "joking about how a starved, shaved and beaten woman might still reject him. I'm helpless with laughter." Without the protective cover of his show, David just stood there, naked. On "Curb," he's an oblivious fanatic who can get away with almost anything. On "SNL," he's a self-aware comic with no margin of error. That's not the best moment for a Holocaust joke.

After watching his act, part of me wanted to say, "Hey, we're Jews. We can take it. We have a sense of humor!" But the other part wanted to say, "You know what? I'm tired of trying to be better. I want to be offended, just like other Americans."

That side won out. For one night at least, I wanted to be like those college students and tap into my sensitive gene. I wanted to be an activist with Jewish Lives Matter and yell to my fellow Jew to curb his enthusiasm.

David Suissa is the founder and CEO of Suissa Miller Advertising, a $300 million marketing firm named "Agency of the Year" by USA Today that attracts clients like Heinz, Dole, McDonalds, Princess Cruises, Charles Schwab and Acura. Suissa's writings on advertising have been published in several publications including the Los Angeles Times and Advertising Age. He is also a columnist for the Jewish Journal in Los Angeles.

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