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July 23rd, 2017

Insight

Gary Aldrich was right

Alicia Colon

By Alicia Colon

Published Nov. 1, 2016

Gary Aldrich was right
   
Lincoln Bedroom renters Linda Thomason and Markie Post pictured treating the bed, regarded as a national treasure, like a trampoline

Anyone who has read Gary Aldrich's 1996 book, Unlimited Access: An FBI Agent Inside the Clinton White House, is not at all surprised at the Wikileaks or Project Veritas exposes of the Clinton campaign.

Mr. Aldrich was a reputable FBI agent until he wrote this book about his experiences in the Clinton White House in which he charged that the first lady was the real power in the White House. Mr. Aldrich's description of the Clinton staff back then explains how her current campaign staff has been exposed in their emails and videos as sleazy, disreputable, hateful and lawbreakers. Mr. Aldrich's book was slammed by the same sycophantic lapdog media that has been covering up for her during her presidential campaign.

Aldrich describes how a comprehensive security system was systematically dismantled by the Clintons so they could bring their friends into the White House -- friends that previous administrations would have barred because of serious ethical or legal problems, some prosecutable. These friends had as little respect for the White House as the Clinton staff. Here's the picture of actress Markie Post and Clinton Arkansas pal, Linda Bloodworth Thompson, jumping on the Lincoln bed.

It was First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, who had usurped control of domestic policy and all hiring decisions. Mr. Aldrich reveals that Mrs. Clinton and her aides thought nothing of destroying the careers and reputations of longtime White House employees to open "slots" for their Arkansas friends. For more information, google Travelgate, Nannygate and the mysterious case of Vince Foster's suicide.

Once in, the new appointees spat on White House tradition, common decency, and even federal law and transformed the presidential residence into their recreational hangout. Aldrich and members of the permanent White House staff were repeatedly shocked to discover drug use, rampant theft, open gay/lesbian sex, and -- perhaps most alarming -- widespread access to classified materials by personnel without security clearances. Does that sound familiar in 2016? Nothing, it seemed, was sacred to the Clintons and their aides -- not even the White House Christmas tree, which under the First Lady's direction became an opportunity for sneering, pornographic sacrilege. There's a photo of these ornaments in the Aldrich book which was pooh-poohed by the liberal media who mocked Aldrich as a just another disgruntled former employee.

But Gary Aldrich was anything but. Gary Aldrich worked for the FBI for more than 30 years, 25 as a Special Agent. Specializing in white-collar crime, especially fraud and political corruption, he also pursued drug dealers and mobsters, and was at the scene of the shoot-out with the Symbionese Liberation Army (kidnappers of Patty Hearst). For the last five years of his distinguished career he was one of two FBI agents assigned to the White House, responsible for performing background checks on White House personnel.

The lapdog media also tried to debunk the charge that Bill Clinton used to escape from the White House for secret rendezvous in hotels and without his secret service detail. What we now know about his strong appetites, this reveal doesn't seem so outlandish.

Why did he write this book instead of going to the media or to Congress? Knowing what we know now about these two resources, we can understand his answer that he wrote in his introduction:

"Some will say that I should trust the system and rely on Congress to blow the whistle on the White House. But I believe that Congress knows even more about what went on at the White House than I did. Yet with the exception of the efforts of a few individual congressmen, Congress's actions have been timid. …"Or some readers will say that I should have left the job of informing the public to the media, to investigative journalists. But in good conscience I couldn't do that, because no one in the media was reporting the administration I saw every day. It was an administration where many little things -- like the evidence police officers drop into small plastic bags during the investigation of a crime scene -- added up to something big."


We know that the media has always been in the tank for the Clintons. We learned back in 1996 what type of people is drawn to the Clintons. When the eight years were up, these lowlifes vandalized the White House and even the New York Times had to report the facts in June 2002:


The General Accounting Office, an investigative arm of Congress, said today that ''damage, theft, vandalism and pranks did occur in the White House complex'' in the presidential transition from Bill Clinton to George W. Bush. The agency put the cost at $13,000 to $14,000, including $4,850 to replace computer keyboards, many with damaged or missing W keys. Some of the damage, it said, was clearly intentional. Glue was smeared on desk drawers. Messages disparaging President Bush were left on signs and in telephone voice mail. A few of the messages used profane or obscene language.


Such classy people and we now know that Hillary Clinton took furniture from the State office for her home in Chappaqua, NY. Her staff is shown on video advocating violence at Trump rallies and ways to rig the election. Wikileaks reveal emails that prove the Clinton and her staff have denigrated Catholics, "doofus" Bernie Sanders, millennials, and patriotic Americans. But she really loves bankers.

Why anyone would want these people anywhere near our nation's White House is beyond me.

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