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November 24th, 2017

Insight

Did Hillary and Bill pave the way for The Donald?

John Kass

By John Kass

Published Oct. 6, 2016

Did Hillary and Bill pave the way for The Donald?

If it weren't for Bill and Hillary Clinton and their awe-inspiring schemes and carnal vulgarities in the Clinton White House, would there ever be a candidate Donald Trump?

No.

Trump wouldn't, couldn't have been a candidate for the presidency if it hadn't been for Bill and Hillary.

They prepared the way. You might even say that Bill and Hillary gave birth to the Donald.

Just think of Bill Clinton in a classic sci-fi movie, with a Darth Vader cape, plastic face and breathing gizmo, offering a black gloved hand to Trump, and saying:

"Donald, I am your father."

I know that the fate of the Supreme Court and the future of the American economy are in the balance with this election.

So thinking of Trump as the Jedi child of Bill and Hillary Clinton is rather bizarre at best. But now that I've put it in your mind, you can't very well wash it out. So you might as well just think on it a piece.

Sadly, most of the American news media can't possibly consider Trump as the vulgar metaphorical child of an equally vulgar Bill. The American media is too busy, overwhelmed as they are with Trump Derangement Syndrome. They pound their tribal drums for Hillary and clench their fists in anti-Trumpian fear and rage, day after day.

I get it. Most are liberal Democrats, and they want Hillary elected, not Trump. I'm definitely not a Clinton fan, but Trump isn't exactly my cup of tea either. I was for Rand Paul.

With so much partisan chanting in the media, it's probably impossible for some to grasp the concept that Hillary and Bill prepared the way for Donald.

But they did. And doesn't it follow, at least in some political/mythological sense, that Bill and Hillary spawned Trump?

They bore him out of their lust to keep power when it was threatened, and those many years of lies about Bill's never-ending vulgarities in the White House.

It all helped lower the standard for the presidency. It wasn't about Bill being asked about boxers or briefs or playing the saxophone on a talk show.

It was about defending what he did in the Oval Office, and trying to sear it into the American mind that it was just about sex, and sex is a private matter, and America had no business in the Clinton marriage.

Of course it wasn't private. It wasn't about a marriage. It was about politicians destroying a public standard, and replacing it with something that suited the Clinton ambitions.

And that eventually allowed a Trump candidacy to be born and grow strong enough to threaten to devour them.

Some Clintonistas will no doubt freak and make angry faces and write angry letters demanding my resignation for daring to infuse wild Oedipal speculation into our presidential politics.

But all I ask is that they don't compare me to Sigmund Freud. Freud is dead. And sometimes, a cigar is just a cigar.

Unless, of course, Bill is involved. And that's the problem, isn't it?

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has great political and organizational skills, but there isn't much in her portfolio of accomplishments, not with Libya and Syria, not with her top aides receiving immunity in her private email server scandal. So Clinton politics dictate that she demonize Trump.

And he's been the foolish demon eager to help her out, hasn't he?

Her media champions shriek about Trump's sexism and his vulgarity, in part because Trump actually is rather vulgar and sexist. But that's not Trump's most grievous sin.

The most terrible sin of all is that Trump dared suggest that in their next debate that he might bring up the past: Bill Clinton's treatment of women back when Bill was president, as Hillary defended him and attacked his female accusers.

And what drives the shrieking and pounding of the media tribal drums is this: Suburban women could decide this election, and everything is being done to keep them from straying from Hillary's side.

Trump doesn't have the verbal dexterity to bring up what happened on Nov. 17, 1995, in the Clinton White House.


So I refer you to Monica Lewinsky, the intern of the blue dress, who testified that Clinton's secretary, Betty Currie, answered the president's door:

"(Ms. Currie) opened the door and said, 'Sir, the girl's here with the pizza."

There in the Oval Office, with pizza in his mouth and Lewinsky on her knees, then-President Clinton was on the phone with U.S. Rep. H.L. "Sonny" Callahan. Clinton was lobbying for support of a military peacekeeping mission in the war-torn former Yugoslavia.

"I do recall talking to the president during which time he was seeking my assistance for the American mission in Bosnia," Callahan said in a statement then that I quoted in a column in 1998. "But I do not have any recollection of any inappropriate behavior or comments from the president during my conversation ...

"I had no knowledge that I was sharing the president's time or attention with anyone else."

Such contempt for the office of commander in chief while discussing sending Americans into harm's way is beyond understanding.

Caligula might have understood it. But I can't. And defending it is in itself corrupt.

Back then, Hillary and Bill fought to keep power. Their media allies supported them. With the Clintons, it's never been about respecting women or worrying about vulgar behavior.

It's always been about power. Always.

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John Kass is a columnist for the Chicago Tribune who also hosts a radio show on WLS-AM.

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