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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review May 6, 2005 / 27 Nissan, 5765

Every face tells a story: 60 years later, survivors' tales offer insight of those who died

By Richard Z. Chesnoff


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Remembering 6 million souls isn't easy. But an ambitious worldwide program — the Holocaust Survivors Memoirs Project — is working to find and publish the memoirs of survivors of the Nazi Holocaust, enabling us to remember those who died by telling the tales of those who miraculously lived through it.


This week marks six decades since the war in Europe ended. And in those 60 years, hundreds of films, books and plays have been devoted to chronicling the story of the savage Nazi slaughter of 6 million European Jews - men, women and children. We have built museums and monuments all around the world, from New York's own Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, to the stunning Holocaust museums in Washington and Jerusalem.


Still, the story of the Holocaust remains utterly staggering. How was it possible to kill so many innocent people? What perverse minds thought up the mass murder mechanisms? What conscienceless people carried it out? What weak people stood by and didn't protest?


In fact, there may be only one way to truly understand the scope of the Holocaust. Not through the formal study of the Holocaust and its perpetrators, but by telling the stories of the individuals who perished, or better yet, the individuals who survived. Ultimately, it may only be through their stories of bravery and, sometimes, luck that we can begin to understand the scope of the destruction.


There have already been sterling contributions to this collective memory of individuals — Steven Spielberg's attempt to record the memories of thousands of survivors and, of course, the classic book of the Holocaust, "Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl," the story of only one of the 1.5 million Jewish children who died at the hands of the Nazis.


The Survivors' Project is funded by Random House Publishing and Jerusalem's Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial, chaired by Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel and coordinated by New York lawyer Menahem Rosensaft, himself the son of concentration camp survivors.


The project has already published six memoirs: from the story of Adam Boren, who escaped the Nazis and went on to fight in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising of 1943, to that of one-time German track star Margaret Bergmann Lambert, who was forced out of the 1936 Olympics by Nazi anti-Semitism and then immigrated to the U.S.


Mountains of other manuscripts wait to go to editors and the press. There's the tale of my friend of 50 years, Efraim Paz of Tel Aviv, a kibbutz pioneer who returned to his native Poland in 1939 to urge family and friends to leave — and was himself caught by the Nazis. There is the story of Ruth Wachner Pagirsky of Belle Harbor, Queens, a Berlin-born Jewish girl whose wealthy family fled Nazi Germany to Poland in 1936 — only to face Hitler's murderers again when Germany invaded three years later. Ruth escaped by posing as a Polish slave laborer. Sent to a German farm, she pretended to be mute for three years to hide her German accent. Of 302 family members, only she and a cousin survived. Liberated in 1945, she immigrated to America in 1946 with her Polish-born friend, Tuska, who had hidden with her. In 1948, she married another survivor, Irving Pagirsky. Today, Ruth Pagirsky visits New York-area schools to tell pupils her story.


Each a tale of miraculous survival; each a testament to those we can only remember.

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CHESNOFF'S LATEST
The Arrogance of the French  

Sean Hannity
This book will open your eyes!

Bill O'Reilly
Why do the French hate America? Richard Chesnoff has figured it out and informs us with entertaining clarity.

Dennis Miller
France sucks, but this book doesn't.

Michael Barone, Co-author, The Almanac of American Politics
Americans-and the French-will learn a lot from this book.

Clifford D. May, President, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies
Richard Z. Chesnoff insightfully-and entertainingly-explores America's most dysfunctional relationship with America's least reliable ally.

Sales help fund JWR.



JWR contributor and veteran journalist Richard Z. Chesnoff is a contributing correspondent at US News & World Report, a columnist at the NY Daily News and a senior fellow at the Washington-based Foundation for the Defense of Demoracies. A two-time winner of the Overseas Press Club Award and a recipient of the National Press Club Award, he was formerly executive editor of Newsweek International. His latest book, is "The Arrogance of the French: Why They Can't Stand Us & Why The Feeling Is Mutual". (Click on cover above to purchase. Sales help fund JWR. )

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© 2005, Richard Z. Chesnoff

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