Home
In this issue
April 21, 2014

Andrew Silow-Carroll: Passoverkill? Suggestions to make next year's seders even more culturally sensitive

Sara Israelsen Hartley: Seeking the Divine: An ancient connection in a new context

Christine M. Flowers: Priest's execution in Syria should be call to action

Courtnie Erickson: How to help kids accept the poor decisions of others

Lizette Borreli: A Glass Of Milk A Day Keeps Knee Arthritis At Bay

Lizette Borreli: 5 Health Conditions Your Breath Knows Before You Do

The Kosher Gourmet by Betty Rosbottom Coconut Walnut Bars' golden brown morsels are a beautifully balanced delectable delight

April 18, 2014

Rabbi Yonason Goldson: Clarifying one of the greatest philosophical conundrums in theology

Caroline B. Glick: The disappearance of US will

Megan Wallgren: 10 things I've learned from my teenagers

Lizette Borreli: Green Tea Boosts Brain Power, May Help Treat Dementia

John Ericson: Trying hard to be 'positive' but never succeeding? Blame Your Brain

The Kosher Gourmet by Julie Rothman Almondy, flourless torta del re (Italian king's cake), has royal roots, is simple to make, . . . but devour it because it's simply delicious

April 14, 2014

Rabbi Dr Naftali Brawer: Passover frees us from the tyranny of time

Greg Crosby: Passing Over Religion

Eric Schulzke: First degree: How America really recovered from a murder epidemic

Georgia Lee: When love is not enough: Teaching your kids about the realities of adult relationships

Cameron Huddleston: Freebies for Your Lawn and Garden

Gordon Pape: How you can tell if your financial adviser is setting you up for potential ruin

Dana Dovey: Up to 500,000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver disease. New Treatment Has Over 90% Success Rate

Justin Caba: Eating Watermelon Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

The Kosher Gourmet by Joshua E. London and Lou Marmon Don't dare pass over these Pesach picks for Manischewitz!

April 11, 2014

Rabbi Hillel Goldberg: Silence is much more than golden

Caroline B. Glick: Forgetting freedom at Passover

Susan Swann: How to value a child for who he is, not just what he does

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle Right Now

Sandra Block and Lisa Gerstner: How to Profit From Your Passion

Susan Scutti: A Simple Blood Test Might Soon Diagnose Cancer

Chris Weller: Have A Slow Metabolism? Let Science Speed It Up For You

The Kosher Gourmet by Diane Rossen Worthington Whitefish Terrine: A French take on gefilte fish

April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 16. 2013/ 12 Mar-Cheshvan, 5774

Homeland Insecurity Alert: Dry Ice and Dry Runs

By Michelle Malkin




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Testing, 1, 2, 3, testing. Jihadists never go on furlough. While shutdown theater preoccupies Washington, terror plotters remain on the clock. The question is: Will America keep hitting the post-9/11 snooze button?

At Los Angeles International Airport, two dry ice bombs exploded this week, and two others were found in a restricted area of the airport. According to the Los Angeles Times, the devices "appeared to be outside the terminal near planes where employees such as baggage handlers and others work on the aircraft and its cargo."

That reminds me: It's been more than a year since watchdogs warned Capitol Hill that our massive homeland security bureaucracy was neglecting these very areas of our nation's airports. Grandmas, babies and war heroes are routinely groped, manhandled and humiliated in the name of transportation safety. But untold numbers of ground personnel still have easy, breezy access to airplanes and luggage.

In August, seven baggage handlers at Kennedy Airport were arrested after being videotaped stealing jewelry, cash, watches and computers from passenger luggage. In June, a baggage handler at Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport was arrested after using his credentials to bypass airport security and carry backpacks containing what he believed were drugs and guns onto commercial flights. It's almost as if any bumbling bimbo can connive his or her way into supposedly secure territory.

A Nigerian illegal alien named Bimbo Oyewole did just that. He used a dead man's birth certificate and Social Security number to get a job with a private security firm at Newark Airport. Con artist Bimbo went undetected for more than two decades while supervising security guards who policed tarmacs, planes and cargo. Last summer, in the wake of Bimbo's belated bust, the DHS inspector general called for stricter background checks on baggage handlers, maintenance workers and other civilian airport employees.

But by the feds' own admission, legions of workers who were grandfathered into the system may yet be traipsing around restricted areas of our nation's airports — doing God knows what. TSA does not keep systematic records on airport security breaches reported to headquarters. "I'm going to tell you right now that the next incident is going to come from the ground," Rep. Chip Cravaack, R-Minn., testified last spring. "It's going to come from the shadow of the aircraft, not from the terminal. I'm telling you that."

Rest assured, however, that we are as vulnerable as ever to the old tried-and-true scheme of sending hijackers aboard planes to take them down. The U.S. Airline Pilots Association spelled it all out in a memo obtained by WTSP Tampa Bay reporter Mike Deeson last week.

"Bringing down an airliner continues to be the Gold Standard of terrorism," the document warned U.S. Airways pilots. "If anyone thinks that our enemies have 'been there, done that' and are not targeting commercial aviation — think again. There have been several cases recently throughout the industry of what appear to be probes, or dry runs, to test our procedures and reaction to an inflight threat."


The assessment bluntly described "a group of Middle-Eastern males" who boarded a flight at Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C., for Orlando, Fla., on September 2. Onboard, the men made "a scene": running toward the flight deck door, loudly opening and shutting overhead bins, and making what appeared to be a coordinated attempt to distract flight attendants. Federal air marshals were concerned enough about the behavior to "make their presence known." The memo notes that a security search found "evidence of tampering" on the plane.

It's just the latest suspected dry run since the 9/11 attacks:

—In May 2011, Yemeni national Rageh Ahmed Mohammed al-Murisi rushed the cockpit door aboard American Airlines Flight 1561 shrieking, "Allahu akbar!" at the top of his lungs more than 30 times intending to take down the plane and kill everyone on board.

—In July 2011, Saudi Arabian national Saleh Ali S. Alramakh caused United Airlines Flight 944 from Chicago to Germany to divert to Cleveland after violating airline security rules during a bizarre meltdown. He locked himself in the bathroom when passengers were supposed to be seated, scuffled with flight attendants and had to be restrained by the flight crew and other passengers.

—In 2010, Pakistani national Muhammad Abu Tahir was sentenced to prison after disrupting AirTran Airways' Atlanta to San Francisco Flight 39. After defying flight attendants and locking himself in the bathroom, the plane was diverted to Denver. His immigration status and occupation were unknown, though he had lived in the U.S. since at least 2002.

—In December 2009, of course, failed underwear bomber Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab boarded Northwest Airlines Flight 253 from Amsterdam to Detroit with skivvies loaded with plastic explosives.

—In 2006, U.S. and British officials acknowledged al-Qaida dry-run plans involving operatives smuggling liquid explosives onto planes through their carry-on luggage.

—In 2004, 13 Middle Eastern men aroused the suspicion of federal air marshals, flight crew and passengers on Northwest Airlines Flight 327 with disruptive red-flag behavior at takeoff and landing.

—And in August 2001, one month before 9/11, actor James Woods witnessed four suspicious Middle Eastern males aboard an American Airlines flight from Boston to Los Angeles. Woods shared his fears with the pilot and filed a report with the FAA. His warning was ignored. Years later, the feds confirmed it was indeed a dry run and that 9/11 lead hijacker Mohammed Atta was on Woods' flight.

Feckless feds keep admonishing the rest of us to "say something" if we "see something." But what good will it do if they're asleep at the wheel, blind to corruption and deaf to jihad?

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.


Comment on JWR contributor Michelle Malkin's column by clicking here.


Michelle Malkin Archives


© 2009, Creators Syndicate

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles

Quantcast