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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 1, 2011 / 29 Sivan, 5771

Postcard from London: Wisconsin on the Thames

By Michelle Malkin




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | LONDON — Big Labor looks the same wherever you go: petulant, irrational and wholly aggrieved beyond its means. I'm here on vacation with family as some 750,000 public-sector employees strike in protest over modest pension reform proposals. It's a taste of Wisconsin on the Thames.

U.K. government teachers are just as shameless and entitlement-mongering as their American counterparts. More than half of England's schools shut down on Thursday as union members took to the streets.

Borrowing a trademark tactic employed by Democrats Against Fiscal Responsibility from Madison and Milwaukee, Wis., to Washington, D.C., British educators used their students and children as kiddie human shields. "HANDS OFF ME MA'S PENSION" read a doe-eyed little girl's sign in Liverpool. The militant National Union of Teachers plastered their placards with infant-sized, pastel-colored handprints.

Simon Shaw, a teachers' union rep in Woodford Green, complained to his local newspaper: "The government is stealing our money, and working till 65 or 68 is not realistic. How do teachers relate to children or have the energy for them at that age?" Asra Haque, a union protester and teacher in Kingsburgy, piled on: "What the government is doing makes us feel like we are part of a dictatorship."

On Twitter, a socialist activist proclaimed "solidarity" between strikers in London and democracy marchers in Egypt. The supposedly fascist measures at issue involve an average hike in teachers' pension contributions of about 3 percent and, in keeping with demographic reality, a gentle nudge in the retirement age to 68 by 2020.

Striking teachers waved banners crying for "FAIR PENSIONS FOR ALL," but as Treasury statistics released in England revealed this week, public-union workers rake in the most generous pensions of all. A "mid-ranking teacher on 32,000 a year will receive a final salary pension that is the equivalent of having built up a 500,000 pension pot. This is 20 times higher than the average private sector scheme, according to figures from the Office for National Statistics," the U.K. Telegraph reported. "Private sector workers would have to save more than 20 percent of their salaries for 40 years — more than 500 a month for a similarly paid person — to amass the same amount in a defined contribution pension." And each and every British family "faces a total bill of 13,500" for the striking teachers' pensions.

Defined benefits plans are increasingly an anachronism in the modern workplace, but Big Labor obstinately refuses to get with the times. More sobering for the children for whom the teachers' unions purport to speak, the U.K. faces a future that is "old and broke." An analysis by the pro-free-market think tank Reform released here this week shows that Britain faces a demographic "timebomb" of an estimated 1.4 million seniors over 65 in the next five years — adding a tax burden of 32billion for pensions and nearly 40billion for healthcare by 2041 (not adjusted for inflation).

The report's authors make conclusions that sound eerily familiar to entitlement-reformers across the pond: "The biggest challenge in encouraging action is that people think that dealing with the problem can be put off. Often population aging is seen as a problem for 2040 or 2050, which is well beyond the attention span of many policy makers and media commentators. But the fiscal effects will be felt much earlier than that. The case for moving quickly is also not just a fiscal one. Any changes will create a group of people who lose out in the transition. Putting off reform will increase the costs of change and make the group of transitional losers larger."

Left-wing teachers around the world spend many hours lecturing their students about the need for a "sustainable environment." Too bad they don't practice what they teach when it comes to their own unsustainable demands.

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