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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 22, 2009 / 1 Menachem-Av 5769

When Cronkite Knew Best

By Kathleen Parker

Kathleen Parker


http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | There was something about Uncle Walt. He was so …avuncular.


Walter Cronkite became the most trusted man in television precisely because he seemed so grown up. The CBS anchor was a pillar of maturity, reliability and unemotional accountability — just the sort of fellow who could sell you a tin of coffee by simply taking a sip.


During a bumpy time in our nation's history, he filled a psychic need for order amid chaos. By showing up every night at the same time, same place — speaking simply and without drama — he conveyed a sense that someone was in charge.


Our nostalgia for his passing isn't only for the death of a familiar and mostly admired individual, but also for a certain kind of man — an iconic reminder of a time when fathers knew best and the media were on the home team.


He had the looks and voice of the sort of man one could trust for good directions. Nonthreatening and, it seemed, untempted by vanity, his prevailing affect was of seriousness and humility.


It is doubtless difficult in these post-metrosexual, celebrity-driven times to grasp the preference that Americans once held for people who weren't "all that." Male figures, also known nearly ubiquitously as "fathers," were especially admired in those days for substance over style.


And, in a page for Ripley's Believe It or Not, the same was true of media.


If Walter Cronkite, or other nightly news figures such as CBS's Eric Sevareid or NBC's Chet Huntley and David Brinkley, ever checked their makeup before airtime, one wouldn't have imagined them lingering over the mirror. For Cronkite's generation, preening was unmanly. As for fashion, shoes came in two colors and four suits was a full closet.


What mattered more than fame or celebrity was content. Cronkite enjoyed fame, but his was the result of his labors in the vineyard..


Every now and then, his game face — the envy of poker players everywhere — betrayed his humanity, though breaking character required the gravest or most miraculous of circumstances.


He shed a tear when he announced that President John F. Kennedy, indeed, had died, though Cronkite resisted the temptation to speculate until the word was official. When man first walked on the moon, Cronkite removed his fogging glasses, saying, "Whew, boy…There he is."


In a seminal and steadfastly controversial media moment on Feb. 27, 1968, Cronkite ended a special report on Vietnam with an analysis, saying that there was no clear victor from the Tet Offensive and that the United States and North Vietnam were "mired in stalemate":


"It seems now more certain than ever that the bloody experience of Vietnam is to end in a stalemate…But it is increasingly clear to this reporter that the only rational way out then will be to negotiate, not as victors, but as an honorable people who lived up to their pledge to defend democracy, and did the best they could." Instead of closing as he usually did — "And that's the way it is," he signed off with, "This is Walter Cronkite. Good night."


This was huge. Newscasters didn't say that sort of thing in Cronkite's day. Editorializing has become pro forma in the Cable Age, but it was so rare then that Cronkite is credited with validating America's disillusionment with the war and with President Lyndon Johnson's decision not to seek reelection.


It was especially huge around my house. On that particular day, my brother was a 19-year-old Marine on a ridge just southeast of Khe Sanh. He says he knew nothing of the broadcast and, "I don't think it ever filtered down to us on the field. We just wanted out of the place…I imagine our response would have been, No [expletive], Walter! Who didn't know that?' "


The newscaster's words did filter everywhere in America, however, and history may have shifted in a different direction as a result. Cronkite's critics and others now say that the Tet Offensive was a defeat for the North Vietnamese and blame him for the birth of media bias that has undermined American faith in journalism ever since.


Whether one judges Cronkite right or wrong in that respect, he brought dignity to news delivery and helped guide a period without cynicism or smugness. That's the way it was and, with rare exceptions, is no more.

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