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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review March 22, 2005 / 11 Adar II, 5765

Two years later, does U.S. still belong in Iraq?

By Jonathan Gurwitz


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | A question is popping up around the globe as the topic of cocktail conversations. Even in countries where cocktails aren't served as a matter of religious propriety, people are incredulously asking, "Could George W. Bush be right?"

Youssef Ibrahim, a former Middle East correspondent for the New York Times, now head of a consulting firm in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, writing in the Washington Post:

"Regardless of Bush's intentions which many Arabs and Muslims still view with suspicion the U.S. president and his neoconservative crowd are helping to spawn a spirit of reform and a new vigor to confront dynastic dictatorships and other assorted ills.

"It's enough for someone like me, who has felt that Bush's attitude toward the Mideast has been all wrong, to wonder whether his idea of setting the Muslim house in order is right."

Columnist Richard Gwyn, a Bush and Iraq war critic, writing in the Toronto Star:

"Here it is time to set down in type the most difficult sentence in the English language. That sentence is short and simple. It is this: Bush was right.

"President George W. Bush wasn't right to invade Iraq. His justifications for doing so were (almost all of them) either frivolous, in comparison to the scale of the venture, or were outright fraudulent.

"Having conquered Iraq and deposed Saddam Hussein, Bush and his officials and generals then made every blunder that could be imagined by an occupying power, adding several original ones of their own.

"But on the defining, fundamental question, Bush was right."

Journalist Claus Christian Malzahn writing for Der Spiegel Online:

"When Reagan stood before the Brandenburg Gate and the Berlin Wall and demanded that Gorbachev 'tear down this wall,' he was lampooned the next day on the editorial pages. He is a dreamer, wrote commentators.

"When the voter turnout in Iraq recently exceeded that of many Western nations, the chorus of critique from Iraq alarmists was, at least for a couple of days, quieted. Just as quiet as the chorus of Germany experts on the night of Nov. 9, 1989, when the Wall fell. Just a thought for Old Europe to chew on. Bush might be right, just like Reagan was then."

From Casablanca to Kabul, people who were supposedly genetically predisposed to suffer despotism in silence are suddenly sounding the chorus of freedom.

If this groundswell for democratic change is causing Arab, Canadian and European critics to feel somewhat conflicted about Bush, it's giving bitter-enders on the American left some of whom are still replaying the past two presidential elections and cynics on the right a case of cognitive dissonance.

Bush, after all, is supposedly an evangelical simpleton and a tool of oil-producing, Arab autocrats or Zionist imperialists, depending upon the source.

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But such ideological fantasies are now running headlong into a brick wall of historical facts. And so the critics must decide.

Are they on the side of millions of Afghans and Iraqis breaking the chains of despotism, Lebanese shaking off the occupation of a dictatorship, Egyptians asserting their political liberty and women across the Middle East claiming their basic human rights?

Or to ensure that nothing positive accrues to the despised Bush and to fulfill the Cassandra-like prophesies about the war in Iraq, are they on the side of homicidal religious fanatics, human rights criminals, racists and sexists?

Supporters of the Bush Doctrine would be wrong to declare as democratic faits accomplis the astounding developments in the Middle East. The likelihood is great that events in the region will more closely resemble Tiananmen Square than the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Far more wrong, however, are administration opponents, blinded by ideological zeal, who are unwilling to grant any credit to Bush for these astounding developments, recognize the American military's role in shattering the Middle Eastern mantle of oppression or cheer the brave people of the region risking their lives to transform their moribund societies.

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JWR contributor Jonathan Gurwitz, a columnist for the San Antonio Express-News, is a co-founder and twice served as Director General of the Future Leaders of the Alliance program at NATO Headquarters in Brussels, Belgium. In 1986 he was placed on the Foreign Service Register of the U.S. State Department.Comment by clicking here.



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