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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Three Sisters Empanadas make for insanely tasty snacking on the go but are just as satisfying to sit down to for a simple dinner

Dana Velden



JewishWorldReview.com | These empanadas are made with a mixture of corn, beans and squash -- a marriage that's traditionally known as "The Three Sisters." When I lived in Colorado, there were a number of Tex-Mex restaurants that offered burritos and enchiladas featuring a blend of three sisters vegetables. At that time, I was a broke college student and a vegetarian, so I had my fair share.

If you're not familiar with the blend, according to Iroquois legend, beans, corn and squash literally supported one another in the growth chain. Native American farming communities would plant corn, beans and squash next to one another because in doing so, they'd need less tending. Beans need no pole if instead they can send their vines up a stalk of corn, for instance. For that reason, corn, beans and squash are still known as "The Three Sisters" and are used together frequently by home cooks and in restaurant kitchens because of their vibrant colors and complete protein. And, frankly, because they just taste great.

This recipe for empanadas is a new favorite for a few reasons. The dough is delicious and flaky, and is made with half whole-wheat flour. With the recipe for this dough in your back pocket, you can venture off into your own empanada creations!

The second reason I love these empanadas is because they freeze beautifully. And it's always nice to have a few options for quick lunches or dinners that you can just pull out of the freezer. To do just that, you can double the dough recipe and throw a ball of dough in the freezer, pulling it out to thaw in the refrigerator overnight if you know you'd like to whip up a batch the next day. Or, even better -- in my humble opinion -- is to double this empanada recipe altogether and freeze a batch to bake when you have a particularly harried weeknight.



THREE SISTERS EMPANADAS

MAKES: 10 empanadas


For the dough:

  • 1 1/2 cups (225 grams) whole-wheat flour .
  • 3/4 cup (105 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup (8 tablespoons) unsalted cold butter, cubed
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 cup ice water, plus more as needed


For the filling:

  • 1/2 pound zucchini (2 medium), cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1 cup corn kernels, thawed if frozen
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3/4 cup canned black or pinto beans, rinsed and drained
  • 3/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced green onions
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro, plus more for garnish
  • 2 tablespoons diced green chilies
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon chili powder
  • Sour cream, for serving, optional
  • Salsa, for serving optional


For the egg wash:

  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 1 tablespoon water




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To make the dough, combine both flours and salt in a medium bowl. Using a pastry blender or your fingertips, cut butter into the flour mixture until it's roughly the size of small peas.

In a separate small bowl, whisk together egg and water. Pour over dry ingredients and mix with a fork until dough begins to come together. If still shaggy, add additional water to help the dough come together, 1 tablespoon at a time. Dump out onto a well-floured surface. Knead dough a few times and carefully gather together into a ball. Wrap in plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator to chill for one hour.

To make the filling, first preheat the oven to 400 F. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

Spread the diced zucchini and corn on the baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of salt and black pepper. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the zucchini are softened and slightly browned around the edges.

Transfer to a bowl. Fold in the black beans, cheese, green onions, cilantro, chilies, cumin and chili powder.

In a small bowl, prepare the egg wash by mixing together the beaten egg and water.

To assemble the empanadas, divide the dough into 10 equal portions (about 55 grams each). Shape each portion into a ball and roll into a 5- to 6-inch circle about 1/8-inch thick on a cool, lightly floured surface. Working one at a time, place 1/3 cup filling into the center of the circle. Moisten the edges with the egg wash. Fold one edge over the top of the filling to create a half-moon shape and crimp the edges to seal.

Place the empanada on a parchment-lined baking sheet, brush tops with egg wash, and repeat with remaining dough. Slice a few small slits in the center of each empanada to help release steam while baking.

Bake at 400 F for 22 to 30 minutes or until lightly browned. Serve with sour cream and salsa along with a garnish of cilantro, if desired.

Freezing Empanadas: You can easily freeze these empanadas, either baked or unbaked, to enjoy later on a busy weeknight. To do so, wrap the empanadas well in aluminum foil and label. To bake the empanadas, preheat the oven to 400 F and bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until golden brown and hot all the way through. Cooking time is roughly the same to warm previously baked empanadas or to fully cook the unbaked empanadas. Do not thaw the empanadas before baking -- simply toss them in the oven frozen.

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(Dana Velden is a writer for TheKitchn.com, a nationally known blog for people who love food and home cooking. Submit any comments or questions to: kitchn@apartmenttherapy.com.)




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