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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Deep-dish cookie: Warm, gooey and a little over the top

By Anjali Prasertong



JewishWorldReview.com | A Pizookie is a cookie baked in a small cake pan, served hot and gooey with ice cream scooped on top.

Combine the pleasure of a warm-from-the-oven cookie with the butterscotch goodness of soft cookie dough and you have a deep-dish chocolate chip cookie. When I serve them at parties, I like to make the dessert completely over-the-top by baking the dough in a big baking dish, piling some ice cream in the middle, and passing out spoons for communal pigging out. It usually gets really quiet from the moment I put it down on the table until the last bits of melted chocolate are scraped from the edge of the pan.

Individual cookies are a little more refined and also make it easier to make a batch of dough, portion it out and freeze it for later gatherings. Made as written, one cookie is a very generous and dangerously easy to eat portion for one, or a just-right dessert for two people after a big meal.



DEEP DISH CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES

MAKES 6 cookies, serves 6-12

  • cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup bittersweet chocolate chips (or 6 ounces dark chocolate, chopped)
  • Vanilla ice cream (optional, for serving)




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Equipment:

6 small oven-safe ramekins (I use 6-ounce oval ramekins)

Preheat the oven to 375 F. In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, salt and baking soda.

In a stand mixer or in a large bowl with a handheld electric mixer, beat the butter until creamy, about 1 minute. Add the sugars and beat until fluffy and pale-colored, about 2 minutes. Add the vanilla extract and egg, and beat for 1 minute. Add half the flour mixture and mix on low speed just until dry ingredients are fully incorporated. Repeat with the remaining flour mixture. Using a wooden spoon, mix chocolate chips into batter.

Divide batter evenly between six ramekins. (To make this easier, you can use a small cookie scoop to measure about 4 rounded tablespoons of batter per ramekin.) Use a spatula or back of a spoon to push batter to the edges of the ramekins and smooth down evenly. Place ramekins on a baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes, or until golden-brown on the edges and still a little golden and soft in the middle. Remove from oven and let cool for at least 5 minutes before serving, with or without a scoop of ice cream on top. (Ramekins will still be quite warm; serve on a folded napkin or plate to protect your table, or let cool for about 10 minutes, until just slightly warm, before serving.)

Recipe Notes

If you like a slightly salty edge to your cookie, sprinkle 1/4 teaspoon fleur de sel evenly over cookies before baking.

The ramekins of unbaked cookie dough can be covered and refrigerated up to 1 day ahead, or frozen for up to 3 months. You do not need to thaw before baking, but you may need to add an extra minute or two to the baking time.

For a more over-the-top party dessert, bake batter in a 9-inch square baking dish instead of ramekins and pass around spoons to your guests, so everyone can dig into the communal dessert.

Anjali Prasertong is a writer at TheKitchn.com, a nationally known blog for people who love food and home cooking. Submit any comments or questions to kitchn@apartmenttherapy.com.)

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