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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Smashed Cherries with Amaretti and Ricotta is simple dessert with a sophisticated taste

By Diane Rossen Worthington





JewishWorldReview.com | The first time I eye fresh cherries at the market, I feel like celebrating. There is something about a big bin of ruby-red gleaming cherries that brings a smile to my face. While the season is short, it is fun to watch the different cherry varieties make their annual debut. I'm not sure who came up with flaming Cherries Jubilee, but I'd much prefer eating a fresh cherry. Bursting with rich, juicy plum-like flavor, fresh cherries are easy to eat and quite a thing of beauty.


In Cheryl Sternman Rule's new book "Ripe: A Fresh, Colorful Approach to Fruits and Vegetables" (Running Press, 2012), she shows readers creative approaches to both fruits and vegetables. When I saw this recipe, I had to share it. The hardest thing to do here is smash the cherries. A word of caution: Wear an apron to avoid permanent cherry stains on your clothes. If you have a cherry pitter, you can use that; but after pitting, flatten the cherries.


Make sure to choose sweet cherries at their peak. I love Rainier, Brooks and Bing varieties. This simple dessert highlights the seasonal cherry with a creamy ricotta topping and a showering of almond-flavored amaretti cookies. Best of all, no cooking is required. Serve in pretty glass dishes for a colorful presentation. You'll find amaretti cookies (Italian macaroons) in larger supermarkets or Italian grocery stores, though you may substitute toasted, chopped almonds if you like.


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SMASHED CHERRIES, AMARETTI AND RICOTTA

Serves 4


  • 4 cups (1 to 11D4 pounds) fresh red cherries, stemmed

  • 3D4 cup whole milk ricotta

  • 2 teaspoons sugar

  • 4 teaspoons milk

  • 1D2 teaspoon almond extract

  • 4 amaretti cookies

  • 1 teaspoon cacao nibs, or mini chocolate chips


1. Thwack the cherries with the flat side of a heavy knife so they flatten. Discard the pits. Divide the cherries among 4 pretty, clear glasses.

2. In a small bowl, stir together the ricotta, sugar, milk and almond extract. Spoon pillows of ricotta over the cherries in equal proportions. Crumble one amaretto cookie over each serving and sprinkle with the cacao nibs. Serve immediately.

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© 2012, Diane Rossen Worthington. Distributed by Tribune Media Services Inc.