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April 21, 2014

Andrew Silow-Carroll: Passoverkill? Suggestions to make next year's seders even more culturally sensitive

Sara Israelsen Hartley: Seeking the Divine: An ancient connection in a new context

Christine M. Flowers: Priest's execution in Syria should be call to action

Courtnie Erickson: How to help kids accept the poor decisions of others

Lizette Borreli: A Glass Of Milk A Day Keeps Knee Arthritis At Bay

Lizette Borreli: 5 Health Conditions Your Breath Knows Before You Do

The Kosher Gourmet by Betty Rosbottom Coconut Walnut Bars' golden brown morsels are a beautifully balanced delectable delight

April 18, 2014

Rabbi Yonason Goldson: Clarifying one of the greatest philosophical conundrums in theology

Caroline B. Glick: The disappearance of US will

Megan Wallgren: 10 things I've learned from my teenagers

Lizette Borreli: Green Tea Boosts Brain Power, May Help Treat Dementia

John Ericson: Trying hard to be 'positive' but never succeeding? Blame Your Brain

The Kosher Gourmet by Julie Rothman Almondy, flourless torta del re (Italian king's cake), has royal roots, is simple to make, . . . but devour it because it's simply delicious

April 14, 2014

Rabbi Dr Naftali Brawer: Passover frees us from the tyranny of time

Greg Crosby: Passing Over Religion

Eric Schulzke: First degree: How America really recovered from a murder epidemic

Georgia Lee: When love is not enough: Teaching your kids about the realities of adult relationships

Cameron Huddleston: Freebies for Your Lawn and Garden

Gordon Pape: How you can tell if your financial adviser is setting you up for potential ruin

Dana Dovey: Up to 500,000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver disease. New Treatment Has Over 90% Success Rate

Justin Caba: Eating Watermelon Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

The Kosher Gourmet by Joshua E. London and Lou Marmon Don't dare pass over these Pesach picks for Manischewitz!

April 11, 2014

Rabbi Hillel Goldberg: Silence is much more than golden

Caroline B. Glick: Forgetting freedom at Passover

Susan Swann: How to value a child for who he is, not just what he does

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle Right Now

Sandra Block and Lisa Gerstner: How to Profit From Your Passion

Susan Scutti: A Simple Blood Test Might Soon Diagnose Cancer

Chris Weller: Have A Slow Metabolism? Let Science Speed It Up For You

The Kosher Gourmet by Diane Rossen Worthington Whitefish Terrine: A French take on gefilte fish

April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 7, 2014 / 9 Tammuz, 5774

Times are tough, as usual: American history is full of hard times, and Americans who have persevered

By David M. Shribman




JewishWorldReview.com | [Terrorists] have formally declared a new Islamic state consisting of parts of Syria and Iraq. Russia, loaded with nuclear weapons and resentment, is looking menacingly at Ukraine. China is rich and restive. Israel is in upheaval over the deaths of three teens. There is no reason to believe Iran is refraining from pressing forward with nuclear-weapons research. North Korea is unpredictable and unreliable. Things are pretty bad.

Now let’s backpedal exactly 100 years. The archduke has been assassinated, Austria-Hungary is looking to Germany for support, a blank check is on offer and before long Russia and France will have mobilized. Things are really bad.

Maybe we should go back a century and a half. The year 1864 was one of titanic battles (Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Petersburg, Atlanta, Mobile Bay) and a vital election (the Democrats nominated the reluctant warrior, George B. McClellan). Things are catastrophic.

How about only a half-century? Fifty years ago this week, Lyndon B. Johnson had just signed the landmark civil-rights bill, but before long there would be riots in Harlem, three civil-rights workers would be found dead in Mississippi, the Democrats would confront a rebellion at their national convention and in a month’s time two U.S. destroyers would be attacked in the Gulf of Tonkin, or so the story would be told, precipitating increased American involvement in Vietnam. Things are bad and getting worse.

Before the year 1964 would be out, Americans would hear two competing views of their future, one from Lyndon Johnson, en route to a 44-state landslide in the November election, and the other from Ronald Reagan, an underemployed actor-turned-activist who would give a celebrated pre-election television speech for Barry Goldwater, who would win less than 39 percent of the vote.

“From Johnson in the East, [Americans] heard prophecies of a coming era that looked like God’s kingdom on Earth, arriving shortly,” Jonathan Darman writes in “Landslide,” a forthcoming retrospective on the year 1964. “From Reagan in the West, they’d heard of the potential for calamity and the extinguishing of freedom, coming soon. Both visions could not stand. Here was the beginning of a great drama.”

All of this raises questions we might contemplate on this long holiday weekend, anchored on the anniversary of the Declaration of Independence and its proclamation of American freedom:

How do we measure the peril our nation has faced — in 1776, when it was young and idealistic; in 1812, when it was vulnerable; in 1861, when it was torn asunder; in 1917, when it waded into European affairs for the first time; in 1941, when war came to Pearl Harbor; in 1950 and 1961, when threats rumbled through Southeast Asia; in 1979, when American diplomats were held hostage by the Iranian Revolution; in 2001, when foreign terrorism crashed into our domestic life; and in 1827, 1857, 1877, 1893, 1907, 1920, 1929, 1937, 1973, 1981 and 2008 (and many more years), when economic distress endangered Americans’ well-being.

The very act of typing all those episodes raises a secondary question: Is the human story — or the American story — simply a tale of woe, challenge piled upon challenge, danger built upon danger?

On weekends like this, when we contemplate our national narrative, we sometimes wonder whether we ever have experienced a period without threat of calamity. The Era of Good Feelings? The first decade of the 20th century? Maybe the 1950s?

That Fifties decade was a period of unusual conformity (unless you count the green shoots, or more precisely the black shoots, of both rock music and the civil-rights movement, or read the work of Jack Kerouac, J.D. Salinger and Allen Ginsburg). It was a period of peace (unless you count the Korean War and the challenges of the Suez Crisis and the Hungarian revolution). It was a period of domestic tranquility (unless you leaned to the left and encountered the McCarthy purges or were black and wanted to attend Little Rock Central High). It was a period of prosperity (unless you worried that the economy was warped by the Cold War, stifled by the absence of women in workplaces outside the home or threatened with inflation).

All the current half-century retrospectives of the decade that followed, the 1960s, carry overtures of deep peril. In the 1960 campaign, both John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon spoke of the decade ahead as a dangerous period of change and challenge, and both sowed worries about America’s ability to compete with the Soviets, maintain our freedoms and sow prosperity. In the 1984 election, 30 years ago, both Ronald Reagan and former Vice President Walter F. Mondale spoke of the hazards of the period and warned they were competing in the most vital election of the period. (In fact, the election of 1980 was far more consequential.)

So on this Independence weekend, the sober lesson might be that crises are always with us. There are very few periods of serenity, and the promise of “domestic tranquility” in the Constitution was a chimera, promised and yearned for, yet illusory, maybe impossible.

But on this holiday weekend should we take that as a gloomy lesson to be swallowed or should we be inspired by the nation’s ability to confront crisis, to continue to believe in its founding principles and to work — as generations of American fighting men and women and civil rights activists have done, as some of our national leaders have done, as most of our citizens have done — to build a nation worthy of its promise, especially that original Fourth of July promise: to recognize that all of us were created equal and entitled to a chance for life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness?

Yes, we live in a perilous time. It is more perilous than that of the 1950s, perhaps, though a Cold War raged. It is less perilous than that of the 1940s, when a hot war raged, testing humankind’s most cherished values. The survival of our country is less uncertain than it was during the Civil War or during World War II, but our liberties are more uncertain than in the 1960s and 1970s.

The hard times are always with us, more or less. But above all, this weekend, and this recitation of all the woes we have confronted, should remind us that our heritage and values require more rather than less from us — and have given us more rather than less.



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David Shribman, a Pulitzer Prize winner in journalism, is executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

© 2014, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Distributed by Universal Uclick, as agent for UFS.

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