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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Dec. 18, 2008 / 21 Kislev 5769

Good Sports, Great Sports

By Bob Tyrrell


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | It is now that time of year when I tune in to the exploits of the National Football League, not the criminal exploits or the soap opera exploits but the real sport of the game. The teams are fighting for berths in the playoffs and ultimately for the Super Bowl. Thus, the play becomes more intense and daring. These are superb athletes. We must bear that in mind, despite their many brushes with the law and the fact that many of them make as much money as a Goldman Sachs executive, though more conspicuously.


Yet my enthusiasm for NFL stars' athleticism has been overshadowed this year by reports of far more prodigious athleticism demonstrated last April by the members of something called Operational Detachment Alpha 3336 of the 3rd Special Forces Group. Their contest took place in Afghanistan's Nuristan province, far from the television cameras and the garrulous commentators. This 12-man Green Beret team fought a seven-hour battle uphill in a freezing mountainous valley after being pinned down by a few hundred insurgents. They and a few dozen Afghans, whom they had trained, got out after killing between 150 and 200 enemy combatants. Half the Green Berets were wounded — four critically. This past week, 10 of these men received Silver Stars, the largest number of Silver Stars distributed to such a unit for a single battle since the Vietnam War.


"We were pretty much in the open," Staff Sgt. Luis Morales of Fredericksburg, Va., told The Washington Post. "There were no trees to hide behind." In the course of the battle, he was shot in the thigh while tending to a wounded team member. Then he was shot in the ankle. He kept on fighting. They all did, even Staff Sgt. John Wayne Walding, of Groesbeck, Texas, who saw a bullet nearly amputate his right leg below the knee. Walding is quoted: "I literally grabbed my boot and put it in my crotch, then got the boot laces and tied it to my thigh, so it would not flop around. There was about two inches of meat holding my leg on."


Readers might want to review Walding's statement a few more times. These men are not only very tough. They have a presence of mind that is incomparable. I submit that they are our greatest athletes. What is more, they perform not for money or celebrity but for love of country and — surely in some cases — to fulfill their historic role as soldiers, ideally as the greatest soldiers. The politically correct might wince, but the heroism of such soldiers adds to life's meaning for them and for those of us who believe there is more to life than the hum and the drum.


Think of their accomplishments. The men of Alpha 3336 undoubtedly can run and hit. They can throw (grenades), and they can catch. But they also can scuba dive and HALO, that is, leap from aircraft at a high altitude (20,000 feet). Then they "low open," i.e., do not open their parachutes until, say, they are at 1,000 feet. From 20,000 feet to 1,000 feet, carrying as much as 100 pounds of equipment, they scan the ground for landing locations. They need that equipment, for when they land, they are on their own. Once on the ground, they might kill, but they also might practice diplomacy. With their exhaustive training in foreign languages and in the customs of the countries in which they work, they are not only warriors but also diplomats intent on winning the locals over against the insurgents nearby. A Green Beret team also includes highly trained medical professionals capable of treating the wounded and attending to the health needs of locals, even their dental needs.


The ancient Greeks considered athletic achievement to be the result of training and talent but also the result of something more: character. With their Silver Stars on their chests, these Green Berets have demonstrated character of the highest order. When the warriors of the NFL shake their fannies in the end zone or their fists in the faces of fallen competitors, I shall be thinking of the men of Alpha 3336. Their example edifies our country and protects it from our enemies.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Bob Tyrrell is editor in chief of The American Spectator. Comment by clicking here.

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