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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Nov. 15, 2012/ 1 Kislev, 5773

Sex and the Generals

By Bob Tyrrell



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Sex remains the surest prop for all that is funny ... and sad. In the first instance, we often call the result ribaldry. In the second instance, it is always called tragedy.

General David Petraeus has, in war, been a hero. In public service, too, he was a national asset. But toward the end of his soldiering, his life is now cast in doubt. As the head of CIA, the doubt has increased. Almost certainly, as director of central intelligence, he was no Dick Helms or Bill Casey. Those names from a better era illuminate the dreariness of this tawdry episode, and I hope it is merely tawdry, not anything more than that. Certainly, it could not be the national betrayal spoken of by Ben Stein this week at Spectator.org, could it?

For now, at least in the case of General Petraeus, this leggy scandal is a tragedy, particularly when it comes to his children, his wife and his, as the news accounts term it, "storied career." In the case of Paula Broadwell, the general's inamorata, it was a disaster waiting to happen. All that running, performing push-ups (partial), graduate work in a fictive study at Harvard University, stylish dress (usually out of place), "competitiveness" -- egads! I could have put General Petraeus in touch with a seasoned international playboy who would take one look at this perfumed stalker and counsel caution. Get out, general, while you can. This woman is trouble and, not to betray my sources, she has been trouble for years.

We live in an era awash in sex or what another generation called sexual hygiene. There is sex education at an early age. Continuing sex education goes on through adolescence. When life begins for young adults, Americans have more information about sex than almost any other discipline, and most of it is useless. They still get pregnant in vast numbers out of wedlock, have abortions and suffer all the other calamities associated with sex. Who doubts that General Petraeus, when he is asked to reveal the details of his sexual adventures in public, will get the shouted question, "General, did you practice safe sex?" The question has been asked before.

Frankly, I relish the American educator or health professional -- usually female -- serving as the know-it-all advisor to society on sex. Remember Dr. Joycelyn Elders, Bill Clinton's surgeon general? She was agog on the topic of sex. One of her forward-looking specialties was masturbation. She thought it should be taught in schools as an alternative to, I am not sure what, group sex, sex with a household pet, his and her sex? At any rate, her pontifications on masturbation got her fired from her job as surgeon general but not before she had held forth on contraception too.

She was for it, and made as much a pest of herself on contraception as the delusional women in the recent election. They seemed to see themselves as irresistible to the male of the species, and thus it was a matter of national security that they receive all manner of free birth control from intrauterine devices to extra-uterine devices to ad-hoc ergo-propter-hoc uterine devises. Dr. Elders doubtless agreed. For sheer hilaritas, give me sex any day.

Now Broadwell's father has stepped from his home in Bismarck, North Dakota and informed the New York Daily News that his daughter is the target of "character assassination." This I cannot conceive, but I agree with him as he went on to say, "This is about something else entirely, and the truth will come out." He added, "There's a lot more here than meets the eye." Ben Stein says the eye should be on Attorney General Eric Holder. Yes, perhaps, but I would keep an eye on Benghazi.

And forget not Broadwell's revelations about Libyans being held prisoner in Benghazi by our CIA.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Bob Tyrrell is editor in chief of The American Spectator. Comment by clicking here.

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