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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Nov 10, 2011 / 13 Mar-Cheshvan, 5772

William F. Buckley, Still at Yale

By Bob Tyrrell



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Last weekend I was given a hint as to how an erroneous idea is born, and how it takes on a life of its own.

I was at Yale University as a guest of the William F. Buckley Jr. Program at Yale. It's run by a group of extremely winning young Yale students who are all admirably conservative. Bill would approve. They all carried themselves like young ladies and young gentlemen. They were confident in their ideas and amused.

One of their goals is to keep the name of William F. Buckley Jr. alive and a thorn in the side of Yale's smug liberal establishment. The theme of the weekend was commemorating the 60th anniversary of the publication of "G0d and Man at Yale," written by the very same enfant terrible , William F. Buckley Jr. It nicely complemented the group's mission of badgering haughty Yale.

There were several panels, and Friday evening, a speech by Bill's great friend, Henry Kissinger. It was a moving speech. Henry and Bill maintained a friendship that was exceptional and endured over a lifetime, overcoming every political disagreement. Henry's opening to China? No problem. Henry's support of President Gerald Ford over Gov. Ronald Reagan? No problem.

Henry's speech and the interaction on the panels went swimmingly, but there was a problem. An erroneous idea was born, and by the end of the evening, it threatened to disfigure the memory of Bill Buckley.

The first glimmer of the erroneous idea was launched on a panel in which Bill's erudition was remarked on. Also, his penchant for polysyllabic words was noted. I think his mastery of debate was mentioned, along with his sailing, his harpsichord playing, and dozens of his other achievements.

Then came the mention of the improbable and the erroneous. Someone got it into his head that Bill was "humble."

Humility has a ready market in America today — especially reflections on the humility of a dead giant. The notion took off. Suddenly everyone — or almost everyone —was attesting to Bill's humility. By the end of the day, Bill and his humility were on par with the humility of Mother Teresa. I was too astonished to protest.

Now, Bill had many virtues. In fact, he had no serious vices that I'm aware of. Still, this great and good man did not include humility in his repertoire of moral assets. In fact, Bill was confident to the point of arrogance.

In Bill, arrogance became a virtue, or at least an asset, when he went up against the likes of Gore Vidal and John Kenneth Galbraith as a talking head or in debate. Both were well-armored in an almost impregnable arrogance. It was only Bill's superior arrogance — allied with his wit and intelligence — that penetrated the likes of Vidal or Galbraith to reveal their essential inanity.

Today Bill's conservatism is everywhere in the ascendency. Vidal and Galbraith's liberalism is scrambling to survive.

Young conservatives in the 1960s were grateful to Bill for repeatedly getting the best of his opponents. He was fun. He was dashing. And he was right. Young conservatives took his cue and followed him into debating their liberal peers on Vietnam, the social issues of the day and politics. They developed a style, and it had little to do with humility. I mean, of all the virtues, humility is the one that we always found inscrutable. I can understand courage. But humility — what's the point?

When Bill began his career with "G0d and Man at Yale," he was in the minority. Then he founded National Review and marched forward. In time, he had a whole army marching with him, taking on the liberals at every turn.

Someday the historians will acknowledge that by the time of his death in 2008, liberalism was on the run and Buckley's conservatism was chasing it. Bill was having a jolly good time. But it had nothing to do with humility.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Bob Tyrrell is editor in chief of The American Spectator. Comment by clicking here.

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