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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 4, 2012/ 18 Tishrei, 5773

Autumn in New York

By Bob Tyrrell



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Autumn in New York — that sound like the title of a song! In fact, it sounds like the first line of a song, and so it is. Autumn is a lovely time of year in many places, but for me my favorite place at this time of year is New York City. As the song goes, it seems "so inviting." And one of the great events marking autumn in New York is the Columbus Day Parade. It reminds us of what a great melting pot it has been, and, one hopes, it always will be.

Christopher Columbus opened the New World to European migration in 1492. He prefigured the spirit of America with his daring, his sense of duty and his piety. Samuel Eliot Morison, in the second volume of his two-volume history, "The European Discovery of America," portrayed Columbus as a truly heroic figure, an exemplary captain of the ocean waves, to introduce us all to the admirable adventure that America has proved to be. 68 years ago, the Italian-Americans in New York City's Columbus Citizens Foundation gave Columbus a fitting memorial in the Columbus Day Parade, and this year on October 8, once again all Americans can come out to honor him and share in the glory that is the American melting pot.

There will be 35,000 marchers representing over one hundred groups. Almost a million people will be spectators as the parade makes its way down Fifth Avenue. It will be a great day to be an Italian-American, and by sundown there will be a little bit of Italy in all of us: pasta, frutti di mare , and a glass of vino , possibly two. The Italians made their contribution to the American melting pot, and we are all grateful for their contributions: cooking, style and their innovations in such areas as the arts, the building trades and investment banking. This year the Columbus Citizens Foundation is honoring the philanthropist and investment innovator, Mario J. Gabelli, as the 68th annual parade's Grand Marshal. He has been one of the good guys in banking for years, and his philanthropy in education, health, and community service only emphasize it.

Larry Auriana, himself a great investor and philanthropist and an eminence at the Columbus Day festivities for many years, makes the point that "Italians did not come to America to change it. They came to America to participate in the opportunities presented by this great country." They came for what America offered, for instance, ideas of freedom, of the rights of man, of the dignity of the individual before the state. In the heyday of Italian immigration many Italians were leaving the old world where they were often treated practically as serfs, for America, where they had rights and freedom that only a handful of Europeans even envisioned. In those days — basically beginning late in the Eighteenth Century — American exceptionalism was the marvel of enlightened people everywhere. America was, as Ronald W. Reagan said, "a shining city upon a hill."

The Columbus Day Parade is a happy time to be in New York City, and it is not a bad time to reflect on the exceptionalism of America. Today we have living in America ingrates that would sneer at exceptionalism. They and popinjays living elsewhere attribute to America all sorts of ills: racism, corporatism, inequality, militarism. It all gets quite esoteric. Yet it has little to do with real American life. America is still Ronald Reagan's shining city upon a hill. It can be improved. It can be made worse. It is in constant need of attention so as to be sure that it is still functioning according to the vision of our Founding Fathers. That is where the Tea Party comes in. Yet it is still the world's best hope. And on this Columbus Day, I am going down to Fifth Avenue and I shall let out a yell for an Italian guy from Genoa who got his boats from the Spanish and was idolized in Paris. Christopher Columbus seems to have anticipated the United Nations by four centuries!

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Bob Tyrrell is editor in chief of The American Spectator. Comment by clicking here.

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