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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Sept. 9, 2010 / 29 Elul, 5770

I like Tony Blair

By Bob Tyrrell



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The left always is lecturing us conservatives on moderation. It would do us good, the left says. If only we were moderate, we might win the fall elections. Yet we are likely to go for people like Joe Miller in Alaska and the dreaded Sharron Angle in Nevada, and we are going to get clobbered -- or at least not win as thumpingly as expected. For some reason, this troubles sages E.J. Dionne and Sam Tanenhaus. I sense they cry crocodile tears, but maybe I have misperceived them. Maybe they really wish us the best. Is it another manifestation of the Liberal Death Wish? As the liberals approach the Islamofascists, they clearly have it, and as they approach the economy, a death wish is all I see. Maybe they have it with conservatism, too.

So take heart, E.J. and Sam. I like Tony. Do you? Is he centrist enough?

He has summed up his worldview in his new autobiography, "A Journey: My Political Life," and I admire it. If he does not write in the most scintillating prose, at least it is his prose. That is more than I can say of any politician on either side of the pond today. Says he: "I profoundly disagree with the statist, so-called Keynesian response to the economic crisis; I believe we should be projecting strength and determination abroad, not weakness or uncertainty; I think now is the moment for more government reform, not less; and I am convinced we have a huge opportunity for engagement with the new emerging and emerged powers in the world, particularly China."

In his autobiography, he is for markets, for engaging the jihadists and for the special relationship with America, according to excerpts from the book published in The Wall Street Journal this past weekend. Reading the book in full will be illuminating. I am particularly curious about how Blair took over one of the most dogmatic socialist parties in Europe and made it, well, rather conservative.

On the economic crisis, he says the market "did not fail." A part of it failed, and then the subprime mortgages were "spliced and diced" and sold around the world with no sense of "the underlying risk or value." He says that "government also failed. Regulations failed. Politicians failed. Monetary policy failed. Debt became way too cheap." So why are Barney Frank and Christopher Dodd still at work in the very areas they screwed up? Well, because regulations do not always regulate. Had regulators called for action, "we would have acted. But they didn't say that."

Blair extends his comments to Islam, in which he argues there is a strain of violence. The West can respond to it, "but it can only be actually eliminated by those within Islam." Regarding the phrase "war on terror," "people distrusted this, partly for its directness, partly because it seemed too limited. … Yet if what we are fighting is not a war, what is it?" Hear, hear, Tony.

Finally, my new best friend -- at least among pols -- adds, "I find the insouciance towards the decline of the transatlantic relationship, on both sides of the ocean, a little shocking." I guess he means insouciance among all the Western powers for concerted action. OK, I shall go along with this, but if it means that we who act resolutely have to dally with the non-English-speaking peoples, I shall do so reluctantly. The fact is that the English-speaking peoples take action. When we give a veto to the French or the Germans or the Russians, there is always the danger that they will put profits for their industries and for their corrupt politicians before strategic considerations. We saw this in the Oil-for-Food scam, and we shall be hearing more in the months ahead.

For now, let us give Tony Blair a careful hearing. He risked a great deal for his beliefs and deserves to be taken seriously. I have yet to see a politician on either side of the Atlantic make such a compelling case. Historian Paul Johnson got me a last-minute appointment to meet Blair at No. 10 while on a quick trip to London years ago. I passed on it, as my flight was booked. Ever since, I have been kicking myself. Talk about penny-wise, pound-foolish.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Bob Tyrrell is editor in chief of The American Spectator. Comment by clicking here.

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