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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Dec. 9, 2008 / 12 Kislev 5769

O.J.ustice

By Cal Thomas


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | "Justice: the administering of deserved punishment or reward."         — www.dictionary.com


In the matter or Orenthal James Simpson, justice was a little late, but last Friday — 13 years after justice was delayed in a Los Angeles double murder trial — it refused to be denied in a Las Vegas courtroom. Simpson was sentenced to between nine and 33 years behind bars for his role in last year's kidnapping and armed robbery of two sports memorabilia dealers at Palace Station Hotel and Casino.


District Judge Jackie Glass said this trial had nothing to do with the previous murder trial at which Simpson was acquitted for murdering his wife, Nicole, and her friend, Ronald Goldman. Maybe not in her eyes, but in the eyes of virtually everyone else who believes the earlier verdict was a miscarriage of justice, this trial was just deserts.


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In a statement before sentencing, Simpson said he didn't know he was "doing anything illegal." He must have been the only one. Simpson and his co-conspirators carried two guns, one of which was displayed, when they entered a room in hopes of retrieving property Simpson said was his. It apparently escaped the participants that stealing someone else's property is illegal and if Simpson had bothered to call the police, the law might have been on his side for a change.


Simpson had led a privileged life prior to the events that led to the "trial of the century." His athletic skills earned him millions. Acting and product endorsements earned him millions more. But all of that wasn't enough. Like some other celebrities — and some politicians — enablers surrounded Simpson and he came to believe he was entitled to whatever he desired. If he lusted after it, it seemed perfectly all right to O.J. Simpson that he should have it. If he was denied something, it appears, he saw nothing wrong with resorting to violence in order to get it.


Culture once frowned on such thinking, but no more. It doesn't matter why you're famous, only that you're famous. Celebrity, not character and worthy accomplishment, is now considered the highest goal. Many enablers helped O.J. avoid the possibility of coming to his senses.


Consider the definition of justice stated above. The concept of deserving anything deemed negative is now foreign in our contemporary culture. How do you punish anyone for anything if nothing can be judged right or wrong? This is the product of courts that have misread the First Amendment and a growing number who have abandoned an immutable standard in favor of moral relativity that is tailored, like a suit, to fit the individual.


There is a reason trials are still conducted. It is not only for the purpose of enforcing the law, but to reinforce social mores. One could hear repeated appeals to those mores in Judge Glass' remarks. It helped, as she said, that the entire crime and the post-crime party during which O.J. and his co-conspirators celebrated their "accomplishment" were recorded on audiotape. Many other norms, laws and standards have been recorded in a different sense — from the Ten Commandments to the common law. As humanity progressed (or regressed), becoming more self-sufficient, we have felt it unnecessary to be constrained by anything, or to be held accountable to anyone.


Such thinking goes something like this: If you have a problem with anything I do, believe, or think, it's your problem, never mine. There is no overarching creator/authority, and so I am entitled to do as I wish. This life is all there is and so who are you to deprive me of anything I think will make me happy, happiness now being the highest and only goal of humanity? Good feelings, not well-doing are all that matter today. Who earns cover stories in popular magazines because of their virtue?


Even if he serves the minimum sentence, which is unlikely, life is effectively over for the 61-year-old Simpson. He received justice for what he did this time and retroactive justice for what a civil court concluded he did to his wife and Ron Goldman. Simpson got what he deserved. That should provide some satisfaction to the families of Ron Goldman and Nicole Brown Simpson, whose "stolen property" is beyond recovery.

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Cal Thomas Archives

JWR contributor Cal Thomas is co-author with Bob Beckel, a liberal Democratic Party strategist, of "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America". Comment by clicking here.

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