Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review March 10, 2009 / 14 Adar 5769

GOPers have forgotten who they are

By Cal Thomas


Printer Friendly Version
Email this article

http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | In the 1987 film "Moonstruck," Rose Castorini, played by Olympia Dukakis, walks home accompanied by a man she met in a restaurant. When he asks her if he can come in, she declines. When he asks why, she responds, "Because I'm married and because I know who I am."


On a political level, that seems to be the problem these days with the Republican Party. Many Republicans have forgotten who they are and what they are supposed to stand for. This is why there was such a strong reaction to Rush Limbaugh's speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington recently. Limbaugh tried to remind Republicans what they once believed in and of the ideas that won them elections. Instead, too many Republicans have tried to cozy up to the liberal elite, hoping they will praise them for being "reasonable" and "moderate."


This strategy has never won Republicans elections, though it may have made some of them feel better about losing.


FREE SUBSCRIPTION TO INFLUENTIAL NEWSLETTER

Every weekday NewsAndOpinion.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". HUNDREDS of columnists and cartoonists regularly appear. Sign up for the daily update. It's free. Just click here.

Michael Steele, the new Republican National Committee chairman, was caught in this Venus flytrap when he seemed to agree with a CNN interviewer that Limbaugh's radio program is "incendiary" and "ugly." In truth, it is educational and inspirational to conservatives and anyone else interested in substance, rather than emotion. Those who call Limbaugh an "entertainer" mischaracterize him. He is a passionate advocate for ideas in which he believes, ideas that brought prosperity to the Republican Party when it also embraced them.


I asked Michael Steele about the brouhaha he didn't start, but to which he contributed. In an interview last Thursday in his RNC office, during which he proudly pointed to a picture of himself with Limbaugh (appropriately off to his right), I asked Steele if he planned to heed the few calls for his resignation.


"No!" he shouted, before I could even complete the question. "And shame on (those) who should have the cojones to at least come and talk to me."


Steele said he called Limbaugh to apologize for his remarks. He said Limbaugh was "very gracious." He agrees with Limbaugh that some Republicans appear embarrassed by their party's positions on certain (notably social) issues. Does Steele think too many try to curry favor with some on the left, especially the big media?


"I do think it's a problem generally," he replied. "I don't think we should worry so much about them and that's why I don't feed them. If I sat and worried about what The Washington Post was going to write about me tomorrow, I would stay in my room."


Steele said he is in stage two of a two-stage process to reform and transform the Republican Party. He won't reveal details, because, "The mice who are scurrying about the Hill are upset because they no longer have access to the cheese, so they don't know what's going on." He says his process has been "insular" because he doesn't want people "pontificating" on his decisions or second-guessing them before they are made.


Barack Obama talked during the campaign, and since becoming president, of the need for a new bipartisanship. Does Steele believe he is serious?


"No! Having a photo-op with a bunch of Republicans, inviting them to have a beer with you, or watch a football game is great theater, but when you don't take our suggestions seriously, when you don't respect our staffs and involve them in the vetting process; when you don't confer with the minority party ... you're not serious about bipartisanship."


Didn't Republicans when they ran Congress do to Democrats what Democrats are now doing to Republicans? "Right," Steele admits, "and everyone (then) clamored for bipartisanship. Did they get it? No."


Steele believes bipartisanship "is a fiction of politics. It's an idea people work toward, but the reality is something else..."


Steele thinks White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel is "running the entire government," noting he is not known for bipartisanship, but for slash-and-burn politics.


Asked where President Obama is weak, since his poll numbers remain in the high 60s, Steele responded, "Everywhere when he puts his policies on the table."


That alleged weakness hasn't yet sunk in with voters, but Michael Steele believes it will soon. First, though, there is that small matter of an extreme makeover for the GOP. Perhaps another film title might serve as a guide for Republicans and where they need to go: "Back to the Future."

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.


BUY THE BOOK
Click HERE to purchase it at a discount. (Sales help fund JWR.).

Cal Thomas Archives

JWR contributor Cal Thomas is co-author with Bob Beckel, a liberal Democratic Party strategist, of "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America". Comment by clicking here.

© 2006, Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles