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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Nov. 6, 2009 / 19 Mar-Cheshvan 5770

Corpse sits up, gets nice salute

By Wesley Pruden




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Neither Barack Obama nor Nancy Pelosi can be as clueless as they want us to think they are. The White House said the president was so uninterested in the results on election night that he watched a documentary on the '08 presidential campaign, no doubt eager to see who won. Mzz Pelosi, as oblivious of the scoreboard as a ditzy cheerleader unaware of which team has the ball, insists her side won the night.

Mr. Obama continues to campaign for the job the rest of us thought we gave him a year ago. The day after the Republicans sent wake-up calls from Virginia and New Jersey, he was back on the stump, working up a sweat -- or at least a gentlemanly perspiration -- and breathing hard against George W. Bush.

"One year ago," he told voters in Wisconsin who probably knew it already, "Americans all across this country went to the polls and cast ballots for the future they wanted to see." When he finally got to Washington, he told them, he discovered "a financial crisis that threatened to plunge our economy into a Great Depression, the worst that we've seen in generations. We had record deficits, two wars, frayed alliances around the world."

Some of this was even true. Americans had, in fact, gone to the polls the year before, and had in fact cast ballots for "the future they wanted to see." Very few voters ever cast ballots for a future they don't want to see. But the rest of his stump speech was a good deal of the windy exaggeration expected during a campaign. But like it or not, Mr. Obama is the president now, and the opportunities and failures at the White House are his. George W. is back home in Texas, where he no longer frightens women and horses. We've still got record deficits, two wars and now our allies don't know what to believe. Someone should break the news, gently, to the president that the election is over and he won.

Rhetoric, even soaring messianic rhetoric, ultimately makes thin, watery soup. Mr. Obama has a gift for shutting his ears against what he doesn't want to hear. The man who listened to the Rev. Jeremiah Wright every Sunday morning for 20 years and never heard any of the preacher's signature rants against Jews and the evil white man insists he didn't see or hear any of the bad news for Democrats in this week's election results.

Some badly frightened Democrats tried to find good things in the details of the Tuesday night returns. Sen. Robert Menendez of New Jersey called the results "a mixed bag" and in no way a referendum on the Obama agenda. Sen. Mary Landrieu of Louisiana, the Little Miss Sunshine of the Senate, agreed. Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada scoffed that the verdicts in Virginia and New Jersey were "just local." Why worry about the results of a race for county assessor?

But there are wiser Democratic assessments for the president to consider. Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia, who owes his own election to the popular view that he is made of tougher stuff than the usual Democratic candidate, says the results will "energize" Republicans and persuade Democrats to get their message "straighter."

But this is President Obama's dilemma. His "message" is his agenda, and that's the whole point of why a community organizer ran for president in the first place. He can dither about sending enough troops to Afghanistan - the "necessary war" he talked about last year is the irrelevant war this year - but he can't dither away his unexpected opportunity to recast the nation into a harmless Little America, small and weak so that it can never again offend the cultured sensitivities of the Swedens or Lower Voltas or Luxembourgs of the world. It may be now or never.

Nancy Pelosi and her purveyors of fairy-tale economics in the House understand this. The longer Congress takes to create the vast bureaucracy to "reform" health care, the greater the likelihood that common sense and a righteously angered public will kill the evil scheme. Most people look at the $1.05 trillion - that's trillion, with a 't,' not a 'b' - health care "reform" and see a debt to crush their grandchildren. The Republicans got a lesson in the elections, too. The natives are restless; Barack Obama's windy eloquence and his 25-cent promises of hope and change are stale and getting a little moldy. Even credulity has its limits. But winning in spite of themselves won't be enough to resurrect the Republican corpse. Unattended corpses get moldy, too.

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JWR contributor Wesley Pruden is editor emeritus of The Washington Times. Comment by clicking here.

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