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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Feb 7, 2014 / 7 Adar I, 5774

Theologians at the United Nations

By Wesley Pruden




JewishWorldReview.com | The Vatican asked for it, with its stalling on what to do about pedophile priests, and putting off what the pope and his bishops know is inevitable. But neither the Roman Catholic Church nor, G0D knows, the United Nations, comes into the court of public opinion with what the lawyers call, with no intended irony, "clean hands."

There's little the Vatican can say about the scandal of its priests except to say they're sorry, and the Roman church has done that. More than that, the Vatican has taken some steps to make sure that scandal will be resolved and certain amends made. But there's a lot more to do, as the Vatican concedes.

The U.N.'s Committee on the Rights of the Child, based in Geneva, scorches the Vatican for its transfers of errant - and in many cases, criminal - priests from one parish to another, in some cases giving a predator a virgin field for exploiting rapacious lust.

If Pope Francis wants a few pointers on how to resolve this scandal permanently, I could offer the obvious tips. If priests must suppress the most compelling of natural human instincts, Rome will continue to recruit a large number of undesirables, men who are constitutionally unable to live up to the teachings of the church, no matter how hard they try. The cruel irony is that little boys, struggling through the tender years of childhood, will suffer most. That's not what Christian teaching is about, and the pedophile scandal hurts every Christian congregation, Catholic and Protestant alike. A priest, like every man, needs the civilizing influence of a woman.

But nobody in Rome has asked for a Baptist critique of a Catholic dilemma, however well-intended such a critique may be. The self-righteous tone of the U.N. panel's report is obviously not so well-intended. "The [U.N.] committee is gravely concerned that the Holy See has not acknowledged the extent of the crimes committed," the report chides, "[and] has not taken the necessary measures to address cases of child sexual abuse and to protect children, and has adopted policies and practices which have led to the continuation of the abuse by, and the impunity of, perpetrators."



All somewhat true, and the Vatican has not denied its complicity in abuse, and promises to take the report to heart, further study, and perhaps action. But the U.N. gives its game away when it criticizes the Vatican for its "attitudes" on homosexuality, contraception and abortion, and piously says it should change its doctrines to make sure the rights of children, and their access to health care, are not abridged. The U.N. is obviously less concerned about the children than about taking shots at one of the important institutions of Western culture.

If the members of the U.N. panel were actually as interested in the children of the world as they pretend to be they would have stirred themselves, consistently and steadily, to identify the greatest and worst offenders on earth. Pedophilia is a crime with neither justification nor defense, and neither are honor killings, female genital mutilation, gassing of children or recruiting children to fight wars that entertain imams and ayatollahs in certain benighted precincts of the Middle East. Where is the outrage?

Where is the outrage over the fact that Saudi Arabia, Syria and Uganda, where some of the worst crimes occur, have been members of the Committee on the Rights of the Child. If the United Nations wants to get in the business of rewriting the theologies of religious faith it could start there. The Koran's sanction of dealing death to infidels has been subject to various interpretations; the United Nations might take it on its learned self to rewrite this catechism to make it plain that when the Koran speaks of death it does not necessarily mean dead as in graveyard-dead, though the imam-sanctioned dead for religious "crimes" in the remote Islamic backwoods always look fairly dead to everyone at the wake.

The theologians at the U.N. could instruct, with the firmness and passion it seeks to instruct Rome about changing its doctrines on homosexuality and abortion, that every man and every woman have the G0D-given right to decide for themselves what to believe, or whether to believe at all, and to change beliefs whenever it suits without worrying about the official goon and his beheading knife.

The religious teaching of the Roman Catholic church, and indeed of any faith, is nobody else's business unless or until it violates secular law. The children of the world deserve better than lives as pawns in a sordid political game.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Wesley Pruden is editor emeritus of The Washington Times. Comment by clicking here.

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