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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review January 6, 2009 / 10 Teves 5769

FREE PAUL JACOB

By Paul Greenberg


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | "This indictment is not about the law, but about politics — ugly, anti-democratic politics."
       —Paul Jacob

The name Paul Jacob is familiar here in Arkansas, where he led the struggle to get term limits adopted in Arkansas. Then he went national as head of U.S. Term Limits and now runs an outfit called Citizens in Charge.


It seems Mr. Jacob has never outgrown his need to put the people, not the politicians, in control of their government. One needn't agree with his ideas to admire his commitment — or defend his right to express them.


But anyone so interested in reform was bound to rile an establishment with an overweening sense of entitlement. So when Mr. Jacob and his merry band of reformers showed up in Oklahoma, they naturally attracted the attention of Drew Edmondson, that state's attorney (and zealot) general.


This time Paul Jacob and company were gathering signatures for a proposal that would have limited that state's legislators' power to spend, spend, spend. Their reward for this show of civic interest? Mr. Jacob and his fellow signature-gatherers, Rick Carpenter and Susan Johnson, were indicted.


The charge? Being part of a criminal conspiracy, to wit democracy. Or as General Edmondson phrased it, attempting to defraud the state by hiring folks from outside Oklahoma to help them gather signatures.


Even though, according to Paul Jacob, these reformers sought signatures only from duly registered Oklahomans. And had consulted state officials beforehand to make sure that they were following the rules. No matter. They were indicted anyway. Welcome to Oklahoma.


But there is justice after all — thanks to the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals. That court now has struck down Oklahoma's law forbidding nonresidents from circulating petitions. Its ruling follows similar ones, just as unanimous, in the Sixth and Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in cases from Ohio and Arizona.


To quote the 10th Circuit, the right to circulate petitions in the United States of America is "core political speech," and so is fully protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution.


Thank you, founding fathers. Thank you, courts that uphold it.


This indictment has been hanging over the heads of Paul Jacob and those helping him garner signatures for a year. If convicted, they would face 10 years in prison for the heinous crime of taking part in American politics. This indictment should be quashed; it should never have been filed in the first place. As the 10th Circuit now has indicated.


But no right is safe unless citizens are willing to exercise and defend it. For there will always be Drew Edmondsons around to challenge rights they don't care for, and not even the Constitution of the United States, for all its virtues, is self-enforcing.


Only citizens willing to fight for their rights, like Paul Jacob, and courts that respect those rights, like the 10th Circuit, can keep the spirit of the Constitution alive.


The bad news is that General Edmondson may pursue his prosecution/persecution of Paul Jacob even after this appellate ruling. His official spokesman says Oklahoma's attorney general will appeal the 10th Circuit's decision. But now he'll have the First Amendment to contend with.


Paul Jacob, who once again has stood up for the rights of all Americans, deserves congratulations. Also, thanks and respect.


The Hon. Drew Edmondson, a bully with considerable power, a high state office and more ambition than respect for the rights of others, deserves something else. The word is he's planning to run for governor in Oklahoma. Which means the best rebuke for his misdirected zeal may yet be delivered by its voters.


The threats to the First Amendment are many and varied, and probably always will be. It may be in the nature of man to seek to suppress opinion we do not approve of; it's so much more direct then answering it and trusting public opinion to decide the issue. The best way to assure freedom of expression, no matter when and where it may be threatened, would be to have an army of utterly determined Paul Jacobs fighting for it.

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JWR contributor Paul Greenberg, editorial page editor of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, has won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing. Send your comments by clicking here.

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