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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Dec. 1, 2010 / 24 Kislev, 5771

GOPers who want to Mend ObamaCare

By John H. Fund



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | House Republicans signaled last night they are serious about trying to repeal ObamaCare but at the same time want to preserve some of its more popular provisions, like restricting health insurance companies.

Incoming House Majority Leader Eric Cantor said Republicans will introduce a repeal bill along with a separate set of provisions designed to replace it with their own health-care vision. If the GOP isn't careful, however, it could be boxed into a policy dead end.

"We too don't want to accept any insurance company's denial of someone and coverage for that person because he or she might have a pre-existing condition," Mr. Cantor told a town hall audience last night at American University in Washington, D.C. "Likewise, we want to make sure that someone of [college] age has the ability to access affordable care if it's under your parent's plan or elsewhere."

This sounds like health-care policy as guided by public opinion surveys. While ObamaCare is unpopular overall and a majority of Americans favor repealing it, certain aspects of it poll well. A new McClatchy Newspapers/Marist survey found that 68% of respondents favor allowing people under the age of 26 to be covered by their parents' plans. And 60% want to deny insurance companies the right to turn people down for coverage on the basis of pre-existing conditions. Even Democrats acknowledge that the insurance market in health care won't function properly if people can sign up for coverage the moment they get sick.

Pre-existing conditions can lead to lead to genuine hardships, and the sad stories make public support for regulation understandable. But much more modest fixes can help better stabilize the insurance market. One alternative is to fund the high-risk pools that 35 states offer their residents as a safety net for those unable to buy insurance.

Republicans should remember that while 60% or more of people who are polled may support intrusive regulation of insurance companies, a majority of voters who elected the new Republican House majority probably don't. Unless Republicans come up with other ways to deregulate the insurance market, their pre-emptive surrender on key aspects of ObamaCare will ultimately accelerate the country's move toward socialized medicine.

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JWR contributor John H. Fund is author, most recently, of "Stealing Elections: How Voter Fraud Threatens Our Democracy". (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.)

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