Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review March 4, 2011 28 Adar I, 5771

Bargaining Over a Flawed Product

By Suzanne Fields




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | If the teachers unions would use their collective bargaining rights to do good for their students rather than doing well for themselves, they could make a stronger case for themselves. The good teachers, if they provide a little evidence, might even make a credible argument for getting paid more money.

But nooooooo. They're talking "me, me, me."

Unions were originally formed as a protection against exploitive employers, but teachers unions are often trying to exploit their employers -- the taxpayers -- even though most of us aren't happy with what we're paying for. The problem has many causes, but negotiating for ever-bigger salaries and more expensive pensions won't resolve any problems.

Fortunately, we're beginning to discover what any kid taught by the old-maid school teacher of unkind stereotype knew in the decades between the Little Red School House and the vast public school system: Learning is largely determined by the quality of the teaching.

Feminism accomplished many good things, opening opportunities for careers for women (married and single), but that meant that many smart, ambitious women became lawyers, doctors, accountants and scientists. They shunned teaching.

That's not to say there aren't lots of smart, ambitious teachers today. There are. But they're not created by graduate schools devoted to Mickey Mouse educationist theory. Nor are the high scorers on the SAT tests usually drawn to teaching. In the 1960s, 25 percent of new female teachers graduated in the top 10 percent of their classes. Three decades later, the number of new teachers at the top of their classes had declined to only 10 percent. What we teach teachers usually determines who wants to be a teacher.

Unlike other professions, where experience and longevity generally means more knowledge gained and consequently a better "product," seniority in teaching has little or no effect on student performance.

"The United States spends $50 billion a year on automatic salary increases based on teacher seniority," writes Bill Gates in The Washington Post. "It's reasonable to suppose that teachers who have served longer are more effective, but the evidence says that is not true."

Only a government-funded institution would allow such profligacy. Nor do advanced degrees or smaller classes make a positive difference.

What is true is that excellent teaching begets excellent students. To that end, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will study teachers whose students show performance gains to see whether there's a way to quantify what makes a great (or even good) teacher.

I wish them luck, though anyone who has ever watched Mr. Chips in the classroom could easily summarize his success as concentrating on three simple principles -- think deeply, teach rigorously and demand excellence. Instead, a new study by the Government Accountability Office reveals that taxpayers currently fund 82 overlapping programs administered by 10 different federal agencies looking for ways to improve teacher quality.

Frederick Hess, a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank, argues that schools rely too much on standardization and efficiency, repeating the same brand-name mistakes by merely freshening up the label.

"Time and time again attempts to scientifically identify the 'right' teacher or pedagogy can stifle problem-solving and yield troubling consequences," he writes in "The Same Thing Over and Over: How School Reformers Get Stuck in Yesterday's Ideas."

We think that all our children should achieve high standards in a variety of subjects no matter their abilities. That's a mistake, and as a result teachers often spend excessive time with remedial students and neglect students who need to be pushed forward.

In most cities, only the well-to-do (and the well-enough-to-do) can afford to send their children to private schools, and the rest are consigned to inferior public schools. President and Mrs. Obama live in a city that spends almost as much on each public school student as they spend on each of their daughters at one of the most expensive private schools in Washington.

Congressmen with school-age children invariably retreat to the nearby suburbs of Maryland and Virginia, where schools are better. They can afford to deny school choice to others because they've already exercised a choice for their own children.

Hess wants to reconsider everything, including changing school hours and the length of the school year and providing online teaching and tutoring.

"Our schools are not a solid foundation for 21st century schooling," he writes, "but a rickety structure that wobbles under the weight of each new addition."

It's too late to renovate. We've got to rebuild.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.


Comment on JWR contributor Suzanne Fields' column by clicking here.

Up

Suzanne Fields Archives

© 2006, Creators Syndicate, Suzanne Fields

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles