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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Feb 10, 2012/ 17 Shevat, 5772

Family Values Without the Wink

By Suzanne Fields




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Every campaign has a storyline, a theme — one written by the candidate's spinners, another by the opposition's trimmers and one, usually the accurate one, hidden in plain sight. Mitt Romney's pushing the storyline of his successful business experience. But his strength against Newt Gingrich, still his chief rival despite Rick Santorum's burst of speed in this week's caucuses of beauty contests, is the authenticity of family values.

Callista Gingrich, pale and pretty in '50s retro, has been compared to Pat Nixon in a plastic, Stepford-wife stance next to her man, a stoic in a sculpted metallic helmet hairdo. Ann Romney, by contrast, looks comfortable as the earthy, robust, naturally fashionable mother/grandmother figure who could grace the cover of a magazine devoted to glam grandmothers. She expresses a depth drawn from her experience guiding five sons to maturity and connecting now with her 16 grandchildren.

Many conservatives in their early flirtation with Newt overlooked the appeal of the candidate who actually lives by the family values they say they admire. Even in an expected unflattering portrait of Mitt in Vanity Fair, he stands out as a family man combining the best of his Mormon teachings as they apply to his marriage and his children. He looks like he believes the teaching of his church that "no other success can compensate for failure in the home."

His wife Ann tells how Mitt would call home from the road, and hearing distress and frustration in her voice, tell her, "Just remember, your job is more important than mine." His wife and sons show no signs of walking the walk with a wink and a nudge we see in so many politicians.

The closely knit family, however, poses problems for Mitt the politician, who doesn't display spontaneous warmth outside the circle of family and close friends, who lacks the easy authenticity we expect from candidates. If he shows too much public pride in his faith, the source of his family values, he risks irritating the evangelical Christians who have strong theological differences with Mormonism. But his reticence suggests a coldness that others interpret as lacking warmth and connection. He can be engaging, even warm, in small groups of people he knows, but his habitual self-discipline in an age that doesn't appreciate discipline doesn't translate well. One critic accused him of "having had his sweat glands removed." Faking warmth and practicing spontaneity is not easy. Only the best politicians can do it and make it look authentic.

But women as well as men may be beginning to see the family man appeal. The man married to the same woman for 42 years beat the man married three times by 22 percentage points among women in Florida, prevailing across every category of education and income. Healthy after tough battles with multiple sclerosis and breast cancer, Ann Romney is now speaking up more to tell their story. Not known for her feminism, she was nevertheless the first wife to be included in the official Massachusetts State House gubernatorial portrait, reflective of their separate contributions and strengths. No doubt she looks forward to sharing a family portrait in the White House.

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© 2006, Creators Syndicate, Suzanne Fields

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