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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 6, 2012/ 16 Tamuz, 5772

HomoNarcissexual

By Greg Crosby



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | CNN news anchor Anderson Cooper has, finally, publicly said he is gay. Wow, what a shock. Thanks Coop, for owning up to what the entire country already knew and couldn't care less about. And by the way, why do you think anybody cares who you sleep with anyway? Why is it so important for you to "out" yourself? Only a complete narcissist would believe that this "admission" is something the world has been waiting for or has any interest in. What a jackass.

Cooper made the announcement in an email to homosexual writer Andrew Sullivan. (I don't normally like to identify anyone by their sexual peccadilloes, but since Sullivan has made it clear over the years that he thinks it's vitally important that the entire world knows his sexual proclivities, I'll go ahead and ID him that way.) Sullivan and Cooper are both members of what I call the HomoNarcissexual community - gay men who are obsessed with themselves and need to let everyone know that they're gay.

"The fact is, I'm gay, always have been, always will be, and I couldn't be any more happy, comfortable with myself, and proud," Cooper wrote in an e-mail to Sullivan, giving him permission to go public with it. "It's become clear to me that by remaining silent on certain aspects of my personal life for so long, I have given some the mistaken impression that I am trying to hide something - something that makes me uncomfortable, ashamed or even afraid. This is distressing because it is simply not true. I've also been reminded recently that while as a society we are moving toward greater inclusion and equality for all people, the tide of history only advances when people make themselves fully visible."

I really don't need to know the sex life of Anderson Cooper. Honestly. My brain has enough useless information in it as it is. I don't need any additional ugly images floating around in my head. Besides, the idea of someone that looks like an albino turtle having sex with ANYTHING is repugnant to me.

That Cooper believes "the tide of history advancing" depends on him telling the world that he sleeps with men is beyond the usual homosexual vanity. It actually tells me that he has an abnormal desire for attention. I'm no psychiatrist, but it seems there's a guilt thing happening with him, some deep-seated need for confession to anyone and everyone who will listen. "Hey world, I do this thing and I'm glad I do it!" Really, Coop? Who cares?

What a person, any person, does sexually is none of the world's business, or it shouldn't be. We all have our own views of morality and normality. Those of us who live within religious tenets have our G0d to answer to, and those who do not, have their consciences to answer to. Mostly I live and let live. Go ahead and do whatever you want as long as what you do isn't harmful to anyone, doesn't involve children, and doesn't require me to pay for it.

But don't tell me who you sleep with and don't ask me who I sleep with. That's my own business. This is what we used to call "personal behavior." Some things should be private. My sleeping habits are one of them. I never felt a need to tell anyone what I did or didn't do in bed, not even close friends. It's none of their business.

This modern tendency of an open book to everyone's lives is both harmful and boring. Harmful because what you do today you might be sorry for in the future. Posting every single thing about yourself on social network websites can come back and bite you years from now. Giving out all your information opens yourself up to those who wish to use it against you. Guess what…not everybody is your "friend."

"Let it all hang out," was a common expression of the sixties. Another stupid idea from that ugly era. Letting it all hang out is ultimately boring to just about everyone except you. This may come as a surprise to some people, but nobody really cares to know everything there is to know about you. Most people have their own lives, their own concerns to worry about. We all don't give a damn about what you did last week-end and with whom. Seriously, it's not all that interesting to us.

But the narcissistic dullards will go on their merry way telling the rest of us all about themselves, every little private thing. We will be told everything, whether we want to know or not. They think they are being so forthcoming, so open, so "history advancing." But what they don't realize is they're just plain boring, more than a bit tacky, and totally unimpressive.

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JWR contributor Greg Crosby, former creative head for Walt Disney publications, has written thousands of comics, hundreds of children's books, dozens of essays, and a letter to his congressman. A freelance writer in Southern California, you may contact him by clicking here.

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© 2008, Greg Crosby

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