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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 28, 2013/ 20 Tamuz, 5773

Cranky, Part II

By Greg Crosby



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Reader response to my Cranky Day smash hit column last week was so overwhelming I simply had no choice but to produce a sequel (even though I usually avoid doing sequels as they generally never live up to the originals). So for all you millions of readers who have clamored for more, here is Cranky Day Part II. Enjoy. And keep those cards and letters coming in, folks. Your constant adoration is what I live for.

Now on with this week's aggravating things that make me cranky and sad.

1. I've been a fan of Jack in the Box milk shakes and tacos for years, but there's a new commercial they've been running lately on TV. If there was a triathlon of disgusting elements in marketing; vulgar, low class, and pandering, this spot would win hands down. It's for a new burger called Jack's Big Stack. The ad features two teenage girls lying on a bed, each holding a smart phone, giggling and talking about what we are supposed to think is some boy.

Girl #1: "He just said, 'it's Big!'"

Girl #2: "How Big?"

Girl #1: "REALLY big! (Giggle, giggle).

Girl # 2: "Tell him to send a pic." Girl #1: "NO!" (Then quickly changing her mind) "Okay." Then we hear a tone indicating that the picture has come up on her screen. Her eyes widen and she says. "WHOA!"



She turns the phone around and we see…. Well, ha, ha, we fooled you! It's only the new hamburger from Jack in the Box. Ha, ha, ha. Oh, aren't we agency folks clever? Aren't we edgy? Aren't we cool? No, actually you aren't at all. You're just unimaginative and predictably classless. This kind of coarse crap advertising has no place on family hour viewing (I saw it played during a Dodger game). Sorry to see Jack in the Box playing the vulgarity card. Chalk up one less place I'll patronize in the future. I'll stick with In-N-Out Burgers, always the best anyway.

2. While watching the classic Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, "Carousel" the other evening, I was struck with the beauty, sophistication, grace, and art of the choreography and the outstanding music and timeless songs. Then I thought about all the people who created this and so many other innovative and beautiful shows of the last century. All the music from the likes of Cole Porter, the Gershwins, Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, Johnny Mercer, Lerner and Lowe, Lorenz Hart, the list goes on and on.

Think of the dancing. Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Hermes Pan, Agnes De Mille, Jacques d'Amboise, Bob Fosse, and so many other highly talented dancers and choreographers. Was that period in human history a quirk? Was it just a serendipitous coming together of talent that could never happen again or only once every few millennia? These creative people had enormous talents that everyday people like me could enjoy and appreciate. They wrote and danced to some of the most beautiful music the world has ever witnessed.

So where are the young Gershwins and Cole Porters today? I can't believe that there aren't highly talented people living today who might be capable of creating the same quality of art as the old guys did. Wouldn't you think today's creative people would WANT to aspire to the heights of the best of the 20th Century? But no, we don't have that, it's not encouraged somehow. Melodic and beautiful music is not being marketed; graceful, innovative dance is not given a platform. Why? It's either because the masses don't want it, or the marketers don't THINK they want it. But for whatever reason, it is not part of our contemporary pop fabric anymore.

3. I don't get the whole Gay Men's Chorus deal. Why is it important to know the sexual habits of a singing group? I know, I know. The whole purpose of the Gay Men's Chorus is not to entertain, but to push the homosexual agenda. But why stop with a choral group? Why not have a Gay Men's basketball team? The San Francisco Twinkies. Or how about a Gay Men's accounting firm? H & R Bruce. Or the Law Offices of Fabio and Jason. And a Gay Men's Plumbing Co. The business opportunities are limitless. Gay Men's Airlines. Gay Men's Sporting Goods (you can imagine what that store stocks).

I'm waiting for the Transgender Chorus. In that singing group the men sing soprano and the women sing bass. And prizes for the audience members who can figure out who's who. Remember the Mills Bros., The Lettermen, the Four Lads, and the Coasters? The only agendas they had were their recording dates. So yesterday.

That's it for this week. Join us next time for the continuing adventures of Cranky Man.

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JWR contributor Greg Crosby, former creative head for Walt Disney publications, has written thousands of comics, hundreds of children's books, dozens of essays, and a letter to his congressman. A freelance writer in Southern California, you may contact him by clicking here.

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© 2008, Greg Crosby

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