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Jonathan Tobin: Defending the Right to a Jewish State

Heather Hale: Compliment your kids without giving them big heads

Megan Shauri: 10 ways you are ruining your own happiness

Carolyn Bigda: 8 Best Dividend Stocks for 2015

Kiplinger's Personal Finance editors: 7 Things You Didn't Know About Paying Off Student Loans

Samantha Olson: The Crucial Mistake 55% Of Parents Are Making At Their Baby's Bedtime

Densie Well, Ph.D., R.D. Open your eyes to yellow vegetables

The Kosher Gourmet by Megan Gordon With its colorful cache of purples and oranges and reds, COLLARD GREEN SLAW is a marvelous mood booster --- not to mention just downright delish
April 18, 2014

Rabbi Yonason Goldson: Clarifying one of the greatest philosophical conundrums in theology

Caroline B. Glick: The disappearance of US will

Megan Wallgren: 10 things I've learned from my teenagers

Lizette Borreli: Green Tea Boosts Brain Power, May Help Treat Dementia

John Ericson: Trying hard to be 'positive' but never succeeding? Blame Your Brain

The Kosher Gourmet by Julie Rothman Almondy, flourless torta del re (Italian king's cake), has royal roots, is simple to make, . . . but devour it because it's simply delicious

April 14, 2014

Rabbi Dr Naftali Brawer: Passover frees us from the tyranny of time

Greg Crosby: Passing Over Religion

Eric Schulzke: First degree: How America really recovered from a murder epidemic

Georgia Lee: When love is not enough: Teaching your kids about the realities of adult relationships

Cameron Huddleston: Freebies for Your Lawn and Garden

Gordon Pape: How you can tell if your financial adviser is setting you up for potential ruin

Dana Dovey: Up to 500,000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver disease. New Treatment Has Over 90% Success Rate

Justin Caba: Eating Watermelon Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

The Kosher Gourmet by Joshua E. London and Lou Marmon Don't dare pass over these Pesach picks for Manischewitz!

April 11, 2014

Rabbi Hillel Goldberg: Silence is much more than golden

Caroline B. Glick: Forgetting freedom at Passover

Susan Swann: How to value a child for who he is, not just what he does

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle Right Now

Sandra Block and Lisa Gerstner: How to Profit From Your Passion

Susan Scutti: A Simple Blood Test Might Soon Diagnose Cancer

Chris Weller: Have A Slow Metabolism? Let Science Speed It Up For You

The Kosher Gourmet by Diane Rossen Worthington Whitefish Terrine: A French take on gefilte fish

April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review November 26, 2014

Getting more from your store




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | When it comes to supermarkets, biggest isn't always best. Consumer Reports' recent survey of 27,208 readers reveals that Wal-Mart, America's largest grocer, is at the bottom of the food chain. The mega-store finished last among 55 supermarkets, earning subpar scores for checkout speed, employee courtesy and meat and produce quality.

Store choice matters because Americans are heavily invested in their supermarkets, averaging 88 trips per year and spending approximately $6,000, according to the Food Marketing Institute, a trade group. Consumer Reports offers this advice on the best ways to save:

•Compare unit prices. They're on shelf tags beneath the products, and they're the only way to know for sure which package size is the best deal per quart, ounce or sheet. Bigger is usually cheaper, but not always. At a local A&P, Consumer Reports spotted side-by-side packages of Hampton Farms peanuts, one 8 ounces and the other 24 ounces. The unit price tags revealed that the smaller bag cost $2 per pound; the larger, $2.66.

• Try store brands. They account for about a quarter of all supermarket products and sell for 22 percent less, on average, than national brands. Seventy-eight percent of respondents who bought store brands said they were just as good, and Consumer Reports' own tests have shown that's often true.

• Consider warehouse clubs. They have everyday low prices, so you don't have to wait for a sale. But consider whether it makes sense for you to pay the membership and to buy in bulk - 20 pounds of flour or 500 feet of aluminum foil, for example. Other drawbacks to club shopping: minimal service, a limited selection and long checkout lines, according to the survey.

• Don't pay for convenience. Prepped and precut commodities from watermelon to garlic can cost extra. At a Price Chopper, portobello mushrooms were $12.79 per pound sliced and $4.99 per pound whole. But sometimes it works the other way; packaged products are cheaper. Consumer Reports saw russet baking potatoes for $1.29 per pound sold individually but $2.99 for a 5-pound sack.

• Capitalize on coupons. In 2013, consumers saved $3.5 billion by using coupons for packaged goods. Manufacturers distributed more than 300 billion coupons that year but redeemed "only" 2.8 billion, according to Charles K. Brown, vice president of marketing for NCH Marketing Services, a coupon processing firm. Don't leave money on the table: Savings per purchase averaged $1.62, Brown says. For all the chatter about paperless coupons that are downloaded to smartphones, 91 percent of all coupons reached shoppers through newspaper inserts.



• Shop early in the sales cycle. Eleven percent of readers complained about stores being out of advertised specials. The problem was worst at Pick 'n Save, Pathmark, Meijer and Tops. Consumer Reports has had the best luck finding the type of bargains prominent in circulars at the beginning of the cycle (usually Friday or Saturday).

• Be loyal. Many chains reserve their best deals for customers who enroll in loyalty- or bonus-card programs. And some have a fuel reward component; the typical discount is 10 cents a gallon at participating gas stations for each $50 spent at the store. Other possible perks: rebates based on purchases (usually $5 for every $500), coupon doubling and buy-one-get-one-free specials, coupons toward future purchases and the ability for those 60 and older to get extra savings on certain days. More than half of Consumer Reports' survey respondents belonged to bonus-card programs, and 84 percent were satisfied with the savings.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.


Previously:


A user's guide to user reviews
6 ways to shop smarter
Gadgets make healthy meal prep faster and easier
Secrets to dealing with devastating messes
Greatest money-saving sites
Your guide to the new insurance rules
Car mechanic fiction vs. fact
Extended warranties are an expensive gamble
Pick the best mattress
Find -- and fix -- the cause of your fatigue
Got joint pain? How to get relief
Four healthy foods you can overdo
How to hear a whole lot better
Interior paints
Want happy feet? Here's how
Don't let these ad traps catch you
Secrets to a better night's sleep
Where to find last-minute vacation deals
Costly fees you should never pay
Should you repair or replace that broken product?
Why prepaid legal services may not be a bargain
Secret scores you need to know about
5 reasons patient portals can lead to better health
7 ways to save money on a gym membership
Food fake out
Four healthy foods you can overdo
Fat facts and fat fiction
Surprising ways to cut your drug costs
Get organized for under $5
7 money stumbles to avoid
How to make great choices in technical gadgets
Cancer screenings you should avoid
In tests of interior paints, newcomer outperforms big names
Unscrambling the latest egg advice
How to buy a coffee maker
Save big on eyewear
Car owners prefer independent shops
How to hear a whole lot better
Bargaining can reap big bucks
Surprising ways to cut your drug costs
Should you report that fender bender?
Great new sites for saving big
Better joints without surgery
6 surprising hazards in your home
Protect your good name online
Great car care gifts
How low car payments can hurt you
High-fiber cereals can satisfy your taste buds
What you need to know about prepaid cards
The only 2 rewards cards you really need
Can good bacteria fight a growing medical threat?
11 things every home should have
Dump your big bank and save
Beauty products you're probably using the wrong way

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© 2013, CONSUMERS UNION, INC. DIstributed by Universal Uclick for UFS

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