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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review April 11, 2014 / 11 Nissan, 5774

How to buy a coffee maker




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | You can spend $200 or more for a coffee maker with interactive displays and the stainless construction you'd find on a pro-style range. But Consumer Reports' latest tests of almost 90 models show that a consistently good cup of joe starts at as little as $40.

The most basic coffee makers make at least a decent cup. But you might want more features than a simple on/off switch. A little more money buys you conveniences such as an automatic timer, a thermal carafe to keep coffee hot longer and settings that allow you to adjust brew strength.

Consumer Reports' top conventional drip machines reached 195 degrees to 205 degrees for about five minutes, the industry standard for optimal brewing. If you're into self-serve, brew-and-dispense models let you fill your cup right from the machine, which keeps the coffee hot. When you're on the go, single-serve models, also known as pod machines, brew a cup at a time from sealed beverage packets -- no fuss, no muss.

When shopping for a coffee maker, Consumer Reports suggests considering these factors:


  • How many cups do you drink? If one cup is enough to jump-start your day, choose a one- or two-cup drip model or single-serve pod machine. You'll probably use less coffee than you would with a full-size model. If you like multiple cups, choose a bigger machine.

  • How long between cups? If you space your coffee drinking throughout the day, consider a model with an insulated mug or carafe. Those keep coffee hot and fresh-tasting for hours.

  • Can't see straight in the morning? For some people, even filling the coffee machine and turning it on is too much to handle in the a.m. If that's you, consider a unit with an automatic "on" switch. For the forgetful who rush out of the house in the morning, an automatic timed "off" feature is also important.

  • Convenience counts. You'll want a clearly marked water reservoir so you can see how much water you're putting in, a swing-out filter basket that's easy to use and clean, and intuitive controls. Don't forget to factor in counter space.

  • Espresso requires a special machine. Espresso is made by a different process -- forcing hot water through packed, finely ground coffee -- so your regular coffee maker won't cut it. Espresso makers range from a simple two-chamber pot to fully automatic machines.



TYPES OF COFFEE MAKERS


When shopping, you'll find several types of coffee makers, including manual-drip systems, coffee presses, percolators and "pod" coffeemakers that brew individual cups using ready-to-use packets of coffee.


  • Automatic drip coffee makers. By far the most popular type, automatic-drip machines have you fill a chamber with water, load coffee into a filter basket and flick a switch to heat the water and drip it through the filter into the pot. Popular brand names include Mr. Coffee and Black & Decker.

  • Pod coffee makers. A newer type of machine, these force water through a little coffee packet, called a "pod," that fits in the machine's dispenser. There's no measuring and spilling of grounds. To operate the coffee maker, you typically fill the reservoir, put the pod in and scrunch it down, and push a series of buttons to produce a cup of coffee. Consumer Reports notes that these are more expensive to buy and operate than other types because you must also buy special coffee refills.

  • Espresso makers. Types of espresso makers include simple manual stovetop models (typically a two-tiered metal pot), steam machines (in which steam pressure pushes hot water through the ground coffee) and electric pump versions. Electric pump versions can range from completely manual, in which you control the full brewing cycle, to fully automatic, in which the machine grinds the beans, makes the espresso and collects the spent grounds in a bin. Some machines use capsules or pods; others can use either ground coffee or pods.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.


Previously:


Save big on eyewear
Car owners prefer independent shops
How to hear a whole lot better
Bargaining can reap big bucks
Surprising ways to cut your drug costs
Should you report that fender bender?
Great new sites for saving big
Better joints without surgery
6 surprising hazards in your home
Protect your good name online
Great car care gifts
How low car payments can hurt you
High-fiber cereals can satisfy your taste buds
What you need to know about prepaid cards
The only 2 rewards cards you really need
Can good bacteria fight a growing medical threat?
11 things every home should have
Dump your big bank and save
Beauty products you're probably using the wrong way

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