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April 21, 2014

Andrew Silow-Carroll: Passoverkill? Suggestions to make next year's seders even more culturally sensitive

Sara Israelsen Hartley: Seeking the Divine: An ancient connection in a new context

Christine M. Flowers: Priest's execution in Syria should be call to action

Courtnie Erickson: How to help kids accept the poor decisions of others

Lizette Borreli: A Glass Of Milk A Day Keeps Knee Arthritis At Bay

Lizette Borreli: 5 Health Conditions Your Breath Knows Before You Do

The Kosher Gourmet by Betty Rosbottom Coconut Walnut Bars' golden brown morsels are a beautifully balanced delectable delight

April 18, 2014

Rabbi Yonason Goldson: Clarifying one of the greatest philosophical conundrums in theology

Caroline B. Glick: The disappearance of US will

Megan Wallgren: 10 things I've learned from my teenagers

Lizette Borreli: Green Tea Boosts Brain Power, May Help Treat Dementia

John Ericson: Trying hard to be 'positive' but never succeeding? Blame Your Brain

The Kosher Gourmet by Julie Rothman Almondy, flourless torta del re (Italian king's cake), has royal roots, is simple to make, . . . but devour it because it's simply delicious

April 14, 2014

Rabbi Dr Naftali Brawer: Passover frees us from the tyranny of time

Greg Crosby: Passing Over Religion

Eric Schulzke: First degree: How America really recovered from a murder epidemic

Georgia Lee: When love is not enough: Teaching your kids about the realities of adult relationships

Cameron Huddleston: Freebies for Your Lawn and Garden

Gordon Pape: How you can tell if your financial adviser is setting you up for potential ruin

Dana Dovey: Up to 500,000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver disease. New Treatment Has Over 90% Success Rate

Justin Caba: Eating Watermelon Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

The Kosher Gourmet by Joshua E. London and Lou Marmon Don't dare pass over these Pesach picks for Manischewitz!

April 11, 2014

Rabbi Hillel Goldberg: Silence is much more than golden

Caroline B. Glick: Forgetting freedom at Passover

Susan Swann: How to value a child for who he is, not just what he does

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle Right Now

Sandra Block and Lisa Gerstner: How to Profit From Your Passion

Susan Scutti: A Simple Blood Test Might Soon Diagnose Cancer

Chris Weller: Have A Slow Metabolism? Let Science Speed It Up For You

The Kosher Gourmet by Diane Rossen Worthington Whitefish Terrine: A French take on gefilte fish

April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

The beard as fashion statement keeps growing

By Aimee Blanchette


Will Jeff Goldblum take the plunge?




No longer reserved for lumberjacks, urban hipsters and Hasidics, beards are moving into the mainstream


JewishWorldReview.com |

LINNEAPOLIS — (MCT) Chris mustache. Other days, "depending on how critical the situation is," it takes more than an hour.

The 29-year-old Brooklyn Park, Minn., resident combs essential oils through his long goatee, then uses wax and a blow dryer to coil the ends of his 15-inch musketeer mustache into perfectly round circles. Hair spray finishes the look.

What started four years ago as a way to honor his late grandfather has become Sorensen's personal trademark.

Thanks to men like him, this devotion to well-coiffed facial hair has made the beard — in all of its incarnations — a fashion darling.

"In the past, facial hair got the creepy-guy, homeless-man vibe," Sorensen said. "Now, you can carry yourself in a presentable and stylish way when you have a good-looking beard."

Thick, trimmed, neat or bristly, beards are as varying as the men who wear them — from blue-collar welders and pro athletes to Paris runway models and downtown businessmen. This widespread appeal has made beards a style statement even in the workplace, where acceptance of the unshaven look is growing (pun intended).

The revival of barbershops, as well as the formation of facial hair competitions and stubble-loving celebrities, are markers that the beard might be entering a new heyday.

This past summer, Schick reported a 10 percent drop in razor sales — indicating that more guys are letting their hair down.

November is peak whisker season. The global Movember movement, which encourages guys to grow mustaches to raise awareness and money for men's health, launched the mustache into popularity in recent years. But the fuller, fluffier beard is vying for its own spot on the facial hair map.

Jason Foster is a recent beard convert. Though he's had some sort of facial hair since he was 17, the big-bearded men who rule TV shows like "Duck Dynasty" and "Fast N' Loud" have inspired him to retire his razor.

"Guys covet facial hair," said the 31-year-old, who works in a corporate setting for a large financial institution. "I feel more manly when I have a beard."

There's some science behind that notion. According to studies, men with facial hair reportedly feel more masculine and are perceived as more virile than clean-shaven men.

Allan Peterkin has written three books about facial hair. He's a pogonologist, otherwise known as a beard expert (yes, there is such a thing).

"From an evolutionary point of view, male apes would jut their jaws out to appear more powerful when meeting their enemies," the Toronto psychiatrist said. "A beard seems to enlarge the jaw, so the guy with the more follicles is usually read as more masculine."

Despite beards' popularity through history, Peterkin said many people still perceive them as "dodgy," as if men behind them have something to hide. Maybe that's why there hasn't been an American president with a full beard since 1893.


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Anthony Licktieg, Juut's master stylist and men's specialist, said that while not everybody finds facial hair attractive, it's becoming commonplace in professional circles. He's styling more beards than ever.

"It's absolutely acceptable — if done smartly and groomed properly," he said. "Guys can take some liberties with their facial hair as long as everything else is buttoned up."

From products and tools, many men will go the distance to get their beards looking just right. Matt Legare says his beard is nothing more than an expression of his blue-collar background. But every six weeks, the 37-year-old welder from Lakeville, Minn., drives 25 miles to get a haircut and beard trim at 7th Street Barbers, an old-school barbershop in St. Paul.

The Twin Cities area has an active beard scene. There's even an annual Beard-Off at First Avenue (scheduled for Feb. 9). Then there are the clubs for men — and the women who support them.

The USA Women's Beard & Moustache Society, also known as the "Whiskerinas," has faux-beard competitions of their own. The Twin Cities chapter is called the Yeti Betties.

As for the guys, the Minneapolis Beard and Moustache Club recruits members with a mission that reads: "We drink beer and live in tree forts. Our blood smells like shaving cream. We represent modern Minneapolis-style facial hair."

The group shares styling tips (drink whiskey and take hair vitamins to thicken your whiskers) and supports one another through changing fashions — usually over beers at Dangerous Man Brewing in northeast Minneapolis.

"It's true, we all seem to like beer," Sorensen said. "Beer and beards go hand in hand like salt and pepper."

At a recent bar gathering of the Minneapolis Beard and Moustache Club, the men even helped groom one another with hair dryers and flatirons before mugging for photos. Many of the club members are featured in a new book by Twin Cities photographer Joseph D.R. OLeary.

"I felt like beards were in fashion but out of favor," OLeary said.

Sorensen agrees. "Many of us have been doing this for years and years. Now people are starting to notice it and respect it," he said. "People blog about it, talk about it and we're getting the positive attention we've been looking for."

Among the club is a champion who has competed at the international level. Michael "MJ" Johnson, of Minneapolis sports a style called the Imperial Partial Beard, an abstract look that blends his mustache and sideburns — the thick dark chops covering most of his cheeks and curving upward.

Recently the 38-year-old wine specialist flew to Germany to compete in the 2013 World Beard and Moustache Championships. He placed second in the Imperial Partial Beard category, bringing back a silver medal to his fellow beardsmen.

"Guys recognize that (a beard) makes a statement," Johnson said. "Besides, why look good when you can look fantastic?"

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