Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Living Smart: Stained, Faded Carpet: Clean, Replace or Dye?

By Angie Hicks




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | (MCT) Cleaning and replacement are common options for stained or outdated carpet. But what about dyeing?

In some cases, and when carpet has life left but even intensive cleaning can't correct a problem, spot-dyeing or whole-carpet coloring may provide a cost-effective alternative to spending $1,000 or more on new carpet.

Experts our consumer researchers interviewed say dyeing your carpet can cost 30 to 80 percent less than buying new.

Carpets can be partially or spot-dyed so that faded or stained areas match the rest of the carpet. Or, in cases where a new color is preferred, the entire carpet can be dyed. For instance, one of our members described how happy he was with the work of a company that changed his baby blue carpet to a warm sand color.

Carpet dye is usually applied with a sprayer and then scrubbed in. Experts our consumer researchers interviewed say dyed carpet can be walked on almost immediately and that the material and process are safe for children and pets.

Dyeing works best on carpets made of nylon, wool or silk. Dye will not penetrate some carpet types, including stain-resistant and extra thick carpets.

To be effective, the color of the dye must be as dark or darker than the original carpet color.

Experts recommend having your carpet cleaned more or less annually, depending on how much traffic it receives. If you hire a professional carpet cleaner, expect to pay $100 to $200 a room, or more for corrective, intensive cleaning. However, cleaning can't remove all stains, and can't restore a sun-or bleach-faded area.



The cost of dyeing varies, depending on the size of the job, among other factors. One highly rated dyer told our researcher that he charges 70 cents per square foot.

Be aware that carpet dyeing is a specialty industry with a limited number of businesses that offer the service. Dyeing is generally most popular with specific consumer groups, such as landlords, hotel operators and people planning to sell a home.

Highly rated carpet experts our researchers interviewed were not united in recommending dyeing as a long-term investment. Some said results can't be expected to last much more than a year, but others say they've had customers who are happy with the results of full-room dyeing even after 10 years.

Highly rated carpet dyers told our team that it's crucial to hire a company that properly trains employees. I suggest that if you're considering having a carpet or rug spot-dyed or completely recolored, be sure to ask what kind of training the company gives its employees in carpet and paint technologies. Also, confirm that the products used are safe for the people and animals in your home.

In addition, ask for several references and take the time to contact them, especially asking how well the dyeing has held up over time.

Be sure to consider hiring only companies that are highly rated on a trusted online source or are recommended by someone you know. Make sure to ask the company for a sample of what the new color will look like.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

To comment or ask a question, please click here.

Since 1995, Angie Hicks has been dedicated to helping consumers get the real scoop on local service companies and health providers. Inspired by the frustrations her co-founder had trying to find reliable contractors in suburban Columbus, Ohio, she started Angie's List to help homeowners find who they should hire and who they should avoid.


Previously:


Consumers flush with choices when replacing a toilet
Bathroom remodeling trends
Energy-efficiency tax credits
Insulation
Furnace maintenance
Child-safety precautions
Preparing your home for fall weather
Clogged gutters
Tree care
Those black streaks running down your roof aren't just unsightly
Want to get organized?
Keeping a lid on toilet-repair costs
Plan ahead: Home generators
Lawn Grubs
Solar panels' green savings
Tips to keep your appliances in good shape
Curb appeal is key in selling a house
The right and wrong ways to use (or abuse) your garbage disposal
Lawn Mower Tune-Up Time
Carpet Cleaning
Hardscaping: Homeowners upgrading outdoor areas
Dryer vent cleaning
Home automation
Central Vacuums
Know signs of a qualified locksmith
Mold Testing and Remediation
Most water softeners are fully automatic
Property sealing your home's envelope
New thermostats can 'learn' home's routine

© 2013, http://www.angieslist.com/ Distributed by MCT Information Services

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles

Quantcast