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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review December 30, 2013 / 27 Teves, 5774

Of men, Giants and Texas Greeks bearing fourth-down conversions

By Christine M. Flowers

Christine M. Flowers


http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | (MCT) I once dated a fellow who fancied himself a die-hard Philadelphia Eagles fan.

He had the epidermal, obvious things covered fairly well. His "man cave" sported a giant, theater-quality flat screen that made the weekly viewing of the game a lifelike experience.

He knew the lingo, and would never say "make the first down" as opposed to "convert," or mistake a safety for a touchback.

He even had the body mass of a defensive end, although toward the end of our relationship his girth became a bit more offensive, if you get my drift.

In other words, the guy appeared to be a certified football fan (as opposed to the certifiable ones who, when kicked out of the imploded 700 Level, resorted to wandering aimlessly in the Linc's parking lot and muttering poignantly about better days).

Sadly, though, the man I could have married turned out to be an imposter.

It was a reality I pieced together in small but telling increments — things that separately meant very little but which told volumes when taken together.

The fact that he preferred to watch the Golf Channel instead of the pregame show on Fox was a clue.

So was the fact that he treated his Super Bowl party the way a woman on any of the "Real Housewives" franchises would; namely, all show and no substance. What I mean by this is that he would pay more attention to the menu and the ambience than to the game.

He actually cared more about whether his clueless guests (mostly the female ones) were having a good time than whether the "team that was not the Eagles" was executing on the field.

By most standards this made him a good man and a fine host, but it troubled me. I mean, I wanted Chuck Bednarik on Sundays, not Suzy Homemaker.

This person also preferred to watch the game in the comforting confines of his basement instead of roughing it out at the stadium. To me, this was unsettling. As a woman who had attended literally dozens of games in all types of inclement weather — including a Monday Night Special at the Vet when the wind chill was lower than Kim Kardashian's IQ — I couldn't understand how a man could actually prefer the crystal-clear reception of his hi-def toy to the fuzzy, alcohol-fueled maelstrom known as Eagles Nation.

Still, affection kept me holding on.

Then came the day that I learned he really didn't hate Dallas.

At that point, the writing was on the cinder-block wall.



To be truthful, the Eagles played a relatively small role in our breakup. But as I look back on the relationship so many years later, I realize that I never could have married a man who was so disconnected from my own Philadelphia reality: generational sports hatred.

I've sometimes mentioned to friends that, in the grand scheme of things, I probably hate the New York Giants more than the Cowboys. That's because New York is like that pretty, snotty cousin your grandparents like and treat better than you on holidays, whereas Dallas is the blond cheerleader who barely knows you exist.

Familiarity breeds more contempt. And yet, in my heart, I know that if I were in a desert with a Giants fan and a Dallas fan and had a flash of Christian charity, I'd share my last drop of water with the New Yorker. That's just how a Philadelphian rolls.

That's also why Sunday's regular-season finale is such an important game. More than a mere game, it's an epochal event. Not only will it determine whether the Eagles make it to the playoffs, it will be a pivotal chapter in the ongoing saga of good vs. evil that has played itself out lo these many decades in Philadelphia hearts (if not in Dallas minds.)

Even if Tony Romo doesn't play, there is such meaning to this battle between a surprisingly good Eagles team and the always-dangerous boys from Texas.

To those who love the classics, let me make this analogy. Every time these two teams meet, at least from the Philadelphia perspective, it's like the "Iliad." Homer knew a little something about destiny and despair, and the capriciousness of the gods. To me, the Eagles have always been Trojans, star-crossed and destined for defeat, but noble warriors nonetheless. The Cowboys are the Greeks, beloved of Olympus (particularly the national-network broadcast deities) who get every possible break and march across the battlefield expecting their victory (which is usually handed to them by the referees).

Some of you may not like that analogy because the Trojans ended up losing the war. But real classic scholars also remember that one of those vanquished Trojans, Aeneas, ended up founding the eventual Roman Empire, which then conquered the Greeks in an epic slap down.

So, that is why I have faith in the team's ability to pull this one out on Sunday.

It is also why I'm very happy to still be single, with season tickets.

Christine M. Flowers is a lawyer and columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Comments by clicking here.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

Previously:



10/28/13: Sense may be in short supply, but that gives us plenty to write about
10/16/13: Hail to the Redskins
10/14/13: It's the most wonderful time of the year
10/07/13: Congress teetering on the edge
09/18/13: It is Miss 'America,' after all, not Miss 'Special Interest Group'
09/16/13: America & its Miss'ed opportunities
09/10/13: We still must be civilization's gatekeepers
09/03/13: Around the world, the cross is in the crosshairs
08/19/13: Blood is on stop-and-frisk judge's hands
08/13/13: Hey, social progressives: Women can actually think with an organ other than a uterus
08/06/13: Media make our enemies seem friendly
07/29/13: Mrs. Anthony Weiner = Hillary 2.1
07/08/13: A voice of reason, from the dustbin
07/04/13: Heroes are all around us
05/27/13: Vietnam vet's words soothe modern tragedies
05/22/13: Circling the presidential-protection wagons
05/15/13: Divorce can't be just the pursuit of happiness
05/07/13: We knew Jackie Robinson, and Jason Collins is no Jackie Robinson
05/01/13: Blame pro-choice lobby for Philly monster
04/23/13: Of damnation, and staring back
04/15/13: Margaret Thatcher changed the world, and didnít have to be a feminist to do it
04/08/13: Taking great pleasure in the death penalty
04/01/13: An easy prediction --- bet on the unpredictable
03/26/13: 'The personal is political' is no reason to change
03/19/13: A word to the whines --- it was just some high jinks
03/11/13: The Great Race Debate, revisited
03/04/13: Marriage goes beyond love
02/19/13: 2 women, and what they're fighting for
02/04/13: Sadly, Scouting seems poised to give up the fight
01/15/13: Reflections from Gettysburg
01/02/13: The mentally ill vs. those who love them
12/27/12: Rapper learns he's just another guy on probation
12/20/12: Cold, hard truth about the killer
12/10/12: When a warm heart meets a cold manipulator
11/22/12: Some women don't know how good they have it


© 2013, Philadelphia Daily News. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

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