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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

5 Stocks to Sell Now

By Kathy Kristof





Come out ahead (if you still can) and lose these laggards


JewishWorldReview.com | Our pans fall into two categories: companies with poor prospects and those with better prospects that trade at absurdly high prices. If you own any of these five stocks, consider dumping it, or at least paring back, especially if doing so won't result in a taxable gain.


We start with three companies that pay generous dividends but appear to be struggling to keep up the disbursements. On the surface, profits seem to be rising at CenturyLink (CTL). But take out one-time items and the telecom company's operating income and cash flow are down from a year ago, largely because customers are dropping their landline phones. Moreover, analysts expect virtually no profit growth over the next few years. What's holding up the stock price is the fat $2.16-per-share annual dividend, which gives the stock a 6.4% yield. But CenturyLink cut the payout in 2013, and Brad Lamensdorf, co-manager of the Ranger Equity Bear ETF, expects it to do so again within the next year.


A juicy dividend is also propping up shares of Diebold (DBD). The maker of automated teller machines is paying at an annual rate of $1.15 per share, and it has a long history of yearly dividend hikes. But those increases have gotten smaller as Diebold's finances have gotten tighter. Declining sales, a major restructuring and the recent departure of the company's chief financial officer all raise red flags. Plus, declining cash flow puts the dividend in jeopardy. Finally, the stock, at 18 times projected earnings, isn't cheap. (All data are through Nov. 1.)


Dominion Resources (D) owns regulated electric utilities in Virginia and North Carolina, regulated natural gas utilities in Ohio and West Virginia, as well as various unregulated units. Analysts expect earnings to grow at a 7% annual clip over the next few years. That's not terrible, but the stock sells for a lofty 18 times estimated year-ahead earnings. Also troubling is that Dominion has been borrowing money and issuing stock to support its $2.25-per-share annual dividend. The company can't keep making those generous payments forever.


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Turning to stocks in fantasyland, Tesla Motors (TSLA) undeniably makes great cars (see Putting Tesla to the Test). Founder Elon Musk is considered a visionary in the same mold as Henry Ford. But Tesla's stock, which has zoomed by a factor of seven since going public three years ago, is priced for a perfect future. It sells for 135 times estimated earnings for the next four quarters. Any stumble will deliver a nasty shock to Tesla bulls.


Like Tesla, 3D Systems (DDD) is a hot stock in a hot industry. Shares of the maker of three-dimensional printers have nearly quadrupled over the past two-and-a-half years. Although 3D's printers could revolutionize manufacturing, the company needs to drum up interest among consumers to support a stock that sells for 53 times projected year-ahead earnings. That hasn't happened, Lamensdorf says. The printers hit Staples shelves last summer, but his checks indicate that few have sold, apparently because they're expensive and because consumer applications aren't obvious.


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Kathy Kristof is a Contributing Editor at Kiplinger's Personal Finance.



All contents copyright 2013 The Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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