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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review December 13, 2012/ 29 Kislev, 5773

Cal Logo 2.0: Let There be UC Lite

By Debra J. Saunders

Debra J. Saunders



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | When you think about it, it's amazing that the high-minded swells at the University of California didn't unveil a new logo sooner. The old logo, which will continue to appear on diplomas and official letters, features the school motto, "Let there be light." Ancient. An English translation of a Latin phrase. And a book. Dead-tree lit. 1868? Dead white guys. Under a star. Too militaristic.

But it wasn't political correctness that relegated the old UC seal to the dusty top shelf reserved for weighty documents only. The new logo, explained UC spokesman Steve Montiel, is "an operational thing." The seal doesn't look so hot when reproduced dime-size. The administration wanted a logo that could be used in different kinds of media and with other logos that represent UC campuses and facilities — yet remain distinct.

Problem is, the new logo is bland, and some versions are ugly. UC 2.0 is not lofty, it's UC Lite.

To be fair, the new brand is not ugly in all of its iterations. There's a blue-and-white version that doesn't remind the casual observer of a flushing toilet.

But a school-colors version that features a filled-in blue U, with a top like the top of an open book and a bottom with a fading gold C, is unappealing. It looks like a tacky smart phone frozen as it struggles to connect with Wi-Fi.

In other words, in an attempt to be forward-looking, UC repeated its history by offending just about everybody.

It looks dumbed down. Designers deliberately got rid of the words, "Let there be light." That offends old fogies like me who think words belong on a university seal. A UC video dramatizes how designers replaced the light motto with light colors.

On the other end of the spectrum, left-leaning students take umbrage with the new emblem's slick, corporate-style branding. They look at the new symbol and see: UC Inc.

Montiel notes that UC has been using the new logo for more than six months with little public complaint until the news media reported on the makeover. "It's been overblown," says he.

UC marketing director Jason Simon tells me that the monogram, which was designed in-house, will be used next to the words University of California. (So there are words.) The logo is flexible, and the design community approves.

John Ellis, head of the California Association of Scholars, however, shares my misgivings about losing the motto. "Let there be light," he said, reminds students and professors that "the university is about knowledge and understanding, first and foremost."

Dumping the motto, Ellis added, serves those who see the primary purpose of the university to be, rather than educating, inculcating students with a social justice agenda.

Simon says the new logo can appeal to 17-year-old applicants. So it's farewell to, "Let there be light." Farewell to words. Let there be light colors.

That's good news for Mitt Romney. If he lives long enough, maybe Seamus won't make his obituary.

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© 2012, Creators Syndicate

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