Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review December 5, 2012/ 21 Kislev 5773

Everybody with a Twitter handle is now a meddlesome aunt to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

By Susan Reimer




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | (MCT) I was giving a speech once to a group of career women who had decided to be stay-at-home moms, and I was waiting to be introduced when I overheard an animated conversation between two of them.

"So, the doctor said she could have a serving of grapes, but he didn't tell me how many grapes were in a serving. Is it, like, three or six? And what is the number if you cut the grapes in half so she doesn't choke? Do you count each half or each whole?

"I mean, really. How many grapes are supposed to be in a serving?"

My kids were in high school or something by then, and it was all I could do not to turn around and tell these young mothers, who were now channeling their professional energies through their children, that, all these years later, it turns out not to matter how many grapes are in a serving.

It never comes up in the counselor's office or on the college application or on the SATs. Like so much advice we get when we are young mothers ("Doesn't that baby need a sweater?"), it turns out not to matter.

Kate and Will are pregnant with what is probably the first child to ever have its own hash tag. And the Twitter advice is already flowing for the parents of #royalbaby.

The pregnancy is reportedly in the earliest stages, and if the Duchess of Cambridge hadn't been hospitalized with severe morning sickness, I am not sure Buckingham Palace would have said anything at all. All the better to forestall the Internet storm awaiting the rookie parents and their baby.

The advice given most frequently is "send the child to public schools," which in Britain actually means private schools, like Eton, where Daddy went. (#twocountriesseparatedbyacommonlanguage) It took a number of Twitter exchanges to clear that up.

There were arguments online about whether Kate should breast feed or not, which made all of us commoners across the pond so glad we are not People-worthy. There was even a Twitter feed on what she should do about her morning sickness. (#crackers)

The advice ranged from "never hire a clown for a birthday party" to naming a girl after Will's mother, Princess Diana. (Another suggested that the royal couple follow the example of David and Victoria Beckham, who named their son Brooklyn, and name the baby Queens if it is a girl.)

Perhaps the worst part about being a first-time mother is all the advice you get from well-meaning aunts and mothers-in-law. But this is really over-the-top. Kate has complete strangers giving her very public advice on the Internet while simultaneously trying to be cleverer than the one before.

One commenter guessed that Prince Harry would now be that Uncle Harry, guaranteed to behave inappropriately at all family holidays. Somebody else welcomed the pregnancy as good economic news.

If a conspiracy could be found in this pregnancy, it would be. While one guy speculated that this announcement was timed by Rupert Murdoch to take the public's mind of demands that the British media be subject to new laws, another said it was timed to take the world's attention away from new settlements Israel is building that would bifurcate any future Palestinian state.

Not everyone in Britain is happy about the news. Someone groused on-line at The Daily Mail that it was "another mouth for the taxpayers to feed," a comment that earned "worst rated" in seconds.

But the good news is, the child is third in line for the throne no matter whether it is a boy or girl, thanks to a change in the rules of primogeniture that the Queen signed off on after Will's marriage.

In the end, who designs the christening gown, whether the child is breast-fed or has a clown at its birthday parties — even what school it attends — isn't going to be as important as who its parents are and where the child ranks among their priorities.

As it turns out, that matters a lot.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

Susan Reimer is a columnist for The Baltimore Sun. Comment by clicking here.


Previously:

Keep your friends close, your enemies on a list

After all these years, relearning 'please' and 'thank you'

Fooling Mother Nature: still not a good idea

Baby Boomer: Looking at retirement, not facing reality

A chance purchase connected a woman to someone who changed her life profoundly, though they never met

Relocation starts to split up the old gang

Remember this: We all forget things

‘Superjobs’ leaving us super-stressed

On entitlements, younger generation has its say

Missing the good old days of the Cold War

Friends can be risky business for teens

In Social Security reports, a story of women's priorities

One soon-to-be grandmother's advice about sweating the small stuff

In my family's universe, I am not a star

Is America ready for a new ‘life stage’?

Paying for good behavior is worth every penny

He's on vacation, but she needs a break

Conan says what we wish we could

Body image issues get a new meaning

A spreadsheet for happiness? Thanks, but I'll take the wine



© 2011, The Baltimore Sun. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles