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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Dec. 9, 2011 / 13 Kislev, 5772

U.S. Postal Service may be beyond saving

By Dan K. Thomasson




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The other day I stuck a piece of mail paying a bill in the front door slot where it was picked up by the postman when he made his daily delivery. The next day when I went out to retrieve the newspapers I found it soaking wet on the walk where he had dropped it. It was the second time.

One would think that this would be enough to convince even a dinosaur like me that perhaps one of the most important institutions in the daily lives of Americans finally had become obsolete, at least as a first class delivery system. But my 20th century mindset is still intact and I firmly believe a viable, reliable postal system is necessary -- that it assures the privacy and protection that the Internet with its enormous vulnerabilities doesn't.

The U.S. Postal Service, of course, is the victim of the dramatic evolution in communications of the last two decades. Actually, the decay began much earlier than email. It started with the service's failure to meet the competition from private systems that stole much of its lucrative package delivery and then its business clients.

That loss had its roots in what now looks like a very bad decision, the privatization of the U.S. Post Office. That now dubious action created a convoluted two-tiered process reliant on Big Labor to represent the then non-union letter carriers and others on the front line of the delivery system. The new service's costs escalated exponentially, helping to turn fledgling private delivery companies like Fed Ex and UPS into financial behemoths.

Well, so much for what seemed like a good idea at the time. What was sold to us as a way of improving efficiency and removing the political taint from an institution once a haven for political patronage has turned out to be a system largely ignored by the government, wallowing in debt, and facing extinction. To avoid such a cataclysmic occurrence, the Postal Service is now contemplating whacking billions of dollars out of its menu, including overnight delivery; once again raising the cost of a first class stamp, and cutting tens of thousands of jobs at a time when the nation can ill afford more unemployment.

Raising the price of the first class stamp alone after a long series of such moves would merely further the demise of what is now called "snail mail" and force millions more Americans into online bill paying and banking. Gone soon may be the cards and letters of a more literate age. While one's Christmas or birthday or get well cards can be created and sent on the computer, the care and intimacy that is explicit in a well chosen expression isn't quite the same. We understand when receiving them that someone has gone to the store, browsed the offerings, paid the clerk, gone home and addressed them, put on a stamp and mailed them. That was a process that exhibited a lot of time and effort, far beyond sitting at home picking out a sentiment from an online array and hitting send.

So what can be done about the mountain of losses sustained annually? It may be too late, but Congress should first of all move to bring the postal service back to solvency, staving off the inevitability of its total collapse. To do that, it may have to rescind some of the institution's independence and be ready to permanently subsidize its annual budget. Obviously, that requires a determination that it is worth saving and a requirement that its operations are closely overseen by a committee that puts aside partisanship to serve the country's interests. Both are a tall order in today's Capitol Hill atmosphere. Letting it succumb might be easier even if it is a long death rattle.

The days are gone when the friendly mailman with his familiar leather pouch over his shoulder was as familiar in your neighborhood as the cop on the beat or your family doctor, making house calls. It was a time when the sound of your mail being put in the box or through the door was as comforting as the early morning clank of the milkman's bottles. Now sadly they are all of the same disappearing piece.

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11/30/11: Do-gooder gets deserved earful

11/24/11: Lawmakers should pledge to think on their own

11/22/11: Iowa: Vital to GOP now, irrelevant later

11/16/11: Pentagon's ‘senior mentor’ service takes hit

11/14/11: With Congress, expect more intransigence

11/08/11: Paterno's illustrious career faces tarnished end

10/31/11: The FBI is burned by its Boston informants

10/18//11: President Inexperienced again picked style and enthusiasm over caution. He must pay

10/10/11: Prosecutors routinely abuse plea bargaining

10/04/11: In Christie,shades of William Howard Taft

09/27/11: One word for Obama's prospects --- ‘bleak’

09/26/11: Obama quickly running out of time

09/23/11: Big-time college football is now all about the money

09/22/11: A trip to the dentist cleans out your wallet

09/06/11: College rankings a useless exercise

08/31/11: Thankful a mother isn't alive to see this hungry mess

08/30/11: ‘Supercommittee’ should meet in secret

08/22/11: Is college still worth it? Some majors are

08/15/11: Pray for miracle from debt committee

08/09/11: S&P mixes credit ratings with politics

08/08/11: Politics again takes precedence over common sense

08/04/11: In modern society, a distinct pattern of senselessness

07/29/11: A debt solution: Throw the rascals out, all of them

07/21/11: Campaign finance reform --- you're kidding, right!?

07/08/11: Casey Anthony jury did its job

07/05/11: Nailing a prominent figure or institution should come at a heavy risk — and an even greater price if proven a hoax





© 2011, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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