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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Dec. 9, 2008 / 12 Kislev 5769

Trouble at Sunset Acres

By Tom Purcell


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Let me get this straight. You moved into a gated retirement community and you're only 45?

That's right. The wife and I paid 40 grand for a unit that was worth 120 grand two years ago! It's the best decision we ever made.

Ah, yes, I read about the trend in The Wall Street Journal. As the economy sputters and more people postpone retirement, many retirement havens are struggling.

Struggling?

Due to a spate of vacancies, property values have tanked. What's worse, stock portfolios have plummeted. At the same time retires have less money to spend, their costs are soaring. Because there are fewer retirees to cover community maintenance fees, those fees have shot up.

That's the breaks, I guess.

Desperate to reduce vacancies and spread costs, some retirement communities are doing the unthinkable: allowing people as young as 45 to move in. That is causing quite a hullabaloo at retirement communities across America.

Hullabaloo?

Letting younger people move in could put local tax breaks at risk. Whereas retirees place a small burden on local municipalities, younger people often have children. Children require schools, new roads and other high expenses -- not to mention that children are noisy.

Funny you mention that. The wife thinks it's about time we start a family.

There are cultural differences, too. Retirees prefer to be around people their own age -- people who share similar interests. They seek a slow and quiet existence.

Hey, it's not my fault I have to honk at slowpoke drivers several times every day.

Younger people, however, are at a different place in their lives -- they enjoy different activities that could annoy older neighbors.

You got that right. All my neighbors do is complain about my racing bike and rock band. Still, the wife and I love the perks.

Perks?

We enjoy free movies in the community center every Saturday night. And the wife has been making a bundle in the bingo hall. Apparently, some of the other players can't hear so well.

How delightful.

I have to admit, too, that it's a lot of fun to be the strongest guy in the fitness center. And I don't mean to brag, but let's just say I haven't met a centenarian yet who can beat me on the pingpong table.

I can imagine.

The wife and I are saving money, too. So many of our neighbors go to local restaurants for early-bird specials, the establishments are dead during regular dinner hours. We get big discounts just for showing up -- even bigger discounts if we sit around the bar later into the evening.

I have to admit that you can't be faulted for taking advantage of the bad economic conditions. This is what recessions are all about. Those who made good decisions prior to the recession are in a position to be rewarded. Those who made risky decisions are being punished.

And here I was being mocked for keeping my money in a jar in the yard.

Your story is also a reflection of how unpleasant corrections can be. Too many of us lived and borrowed way beyond our means and the bill has come due -- now many unpleasant adjustments must be made. Still, I hope you can understand why some retirees are resentful to have you as their neighbor.

Resentful? I'm helping them cover their maintenance costs and build their property values back up. They should be thanking me.

There's some truth in what you say.

Besides, I'm plenty old enough to live in a gated retirement community. In this economy, 45 is the new 65!

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