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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Dec. 29, 2005 / 28 Kislev, 5766

Cooking up relief for busy moms

By Lenore Skenazy


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | You can bet June Cleaver had a home-cooked meal on the table every night, which is why Wally and Beaver never became crackheads. After all, dinner is supposedly the "anti-drug."


But what are today's moms supposed to do — come home, ditch the pumps, help with the homework, kiss the hubby hello, pick up a kid or two from basketball and still somehow manage to cook a Cleaverian capon?


No can do, Bub! This revolution is missing a cog! Tonight's supper is macaroni with steamed mom — same as last night.


Or at least, that was pretty much the menu chez most working moms until a second revolution started taking off — the one that might finally make the first revolution work.


It's called fresh meal assembly, or easy meal preparation — evolving terms for a slew of new out-of-home kitchens that women are opening up all over America — more than 500 to date, up from just 100 of them in 2003 and zero in 1998.


They haven't reached New York City yet, probably because the rent here is prohibitive and the takeout plentiful. But the rest of the country is becoming very familiar with these storefronts, each equipped with about a dozen counters and, at every counter, all the preshopped, prechopped ingredients necessary to make the recipe sitting right there in front of you: cinnamon pork tenderloin, say, or coconut shrimp.


Most easy meal kitchens run two-hour sessions during which customers assemble 12 freezer-ready meals, which each feed a family of six. The price is about $200, or less than $3 a serving. And the fact that these meals actually get cooked at home, suffusing the kitchen with Cleaver-era aromas? Priceless.


"To be honest," admits Westchester mom of twins Nancy Beard, "we did a lot of takeout and, G0d help us, Lean Cuisine." That was before she discovered One Two Three Dinner in Briarcliff Manor. Now she arranges to meet friends there, and together they make dinners and socialize while they do it. "We just did five meals in an hour and a half," she beams.


It's the conviviality as much as the convenience that makes these public kitchens so compelling. When women joined the workforce, they not only lost the time to cook, they also lost the time to chat. These out-of-home kitchens give ladies (and the occasional guy) a chance to socialize while still being productive. Meanwhile, the husbands are so grateful for non-nugget meals that they often volunteer to baby-sit. Talk about win-win.


"I've never seen anything quite like this, that's bubbled up from the ground up and so fundamentally solves problem," says Bert Vermeulen, president of the Easy Meal Preparation Association. If dinner is the anti-drug and working moms are, for better or worse, still expected to make that dinner happen, easy meal prep is the missing link. Now when working dads start getting together for playgroups, we'll be all set.

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JWR contributor Lenore Skenazy is a columnist for The New York Daily News. Comment by clicking here.

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