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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

A buyer's guide to natural sweeteners

By Lisa D'Agrosa, R.D.


Honey's antioxidant quantity varies greatly based on type; buckwheat honey (shown) typically delivers the most



Know the differences. It matters


JewishWorldReview.com | Confused in the sugar aisle? With so many different sweeteners available,, it can be tough to decide which one to buy. Whether you pick white or brown sugar, maple syrup, honey, molasses or another sweetener is still predominately based on taste preferences rather than nutrition.

Increasingly, some sweeteners are being touted as healthy, but are they really? We compared the nutrition profiles and calorie counts of 12 sweeteners to help you decide which to choose and how to use it.

1. GRANULATED SUGAR

1 cup: 720 calories

Science Says: Composed of 50 percent glucose, 50 percent fructose, this pure white sugar has been processed so has few minerals and antioxidants.

Best for: Making sugar cookies, meringue toppings and delicate, fluffy cakes.

To Use in Baking: Follow the recipe as written.

2. AGAVE NECTAR

1 cup: 960 calories

Science Says: Agave contains up to 90 percent fructose--the most of any of the sweeteners mentioned here.

Best for: Giving smoothies and iced drinks a touch of sweetness.

To Use in Baking: For 1 cup sugar use: 3/4 cup agave and reduce liquid by 2 Tbsp. for each cup replaced and lower oven temp by 25 degrees F.



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3. HONEY

1 cup: 960 calories

Science Says: Delivers slightly more fructose than glucose. Honey's antioxidant quantity varies greatly based on type; buckwheat honey typically delivers the most.

Best for: Providing a delicate, sweet flavor to dressings, marinades and slaws.

To Use in Baking: For 1 cup sugar use: 3/4 cup honey, reduce liquid by 2 Tbsp. for each cup replaced and lower oven temperature by 25 degrees F.

4. MOLASSES

1 cup: 960 calories

Science Says: About 50 percent each glucose and fructose, dark molasses has the highest antioxidant levels of all sweeteners (per serving, similar to levels in nuts and berries).

Best for: Adds distinct flavor and a hint of sweetness to baked beans, homemade BBQ sauces, brown bread and ginger cookies. Has a toasty, slightly bitter flavor.

To Use in Baking: For 1 cup sugar use: 1-1/3 cups molasses, reduce liquid by 2 Tbsp. for each cup replaced and lower oven temperature by 25 degrees F.

5. BROWN SUGAR

1 cup: 720 calories

Science Says: 50 percent fructose and 50 percent glucose. Made by adding molasses back to white sugar, brown sugar has more calcium and iron than white (but only trace amounts).

Best for: Bringing caramel flavor to cookies and brownies, darker cakes like carrot cake and quick bread; topping oatmeal and fruit crisps and crumbles

To Use in Baking: For 1 cup sugar use: 1 cup packed brown sugar.

6. TURBINADO (raw sugar)

1 cup: 720 calories

Science Says: 50 percent fructose and 50 percent glucose, the brown color comes from small amounts of molasses that haven't been stripped out.

Best for: Topping cookies and quick breads with a sugary crackle.

To Use in Baking: For 1 cup sugar use: 1 cup turbinado.

7. MAPLE SYRUP

1 cup: 800 calories

Science Says: About 50-50 glucose and fructose (depending on grade), it contains small amounts of polyphenols--antioxidants that help quell inflammation.

Best for: Flavoring pork with a glaze or as part of a marinade or salad dressing. And for pouring on pancakes, waffles and French toast.

To Use in Baking: For 1 cup sugar use: 3/4 cup maple syrup and reduce liquid by 2 Tbsp. for each cup replaced.

8. DATE SUGAR

1 cup: 480 calories

Science Says: Made from ground dates, it delivers all the nutrients in dates, including potassium and calcium--and is similar in antioxidants to molasses.

Best for: Baking banana bread and bar cookies.

To Use in Baking: For 1 cup sugar use: 2/3 cup date sugar.

9. BROWN RICE SYRUP

1 cup: 1,200 calories

Science Says: This sweetener made news earlier this year when researchers detected high levels of the carcinogen arsenic in products made with it.

Best for: Holding together energy bars and sweetening smoothies and muffins

To Use in Baking: For 1 cup sugar use: 1-1/4 cups brown rice syrup, reduce liquid by 2 Tbsp. and lower oven temperature by 25 degrees F.

10. CORN SYRUP

1 cup: 960 calories

Science Says: Not the same as high-fructose corn syrup, corn syrup contains less fructose and isn't as processed as HFCS.

Best for: Setting up pecan pie, peanut brittle, popcorn balls and homemade candies.

To Use in Baking: For 1 cup sugar use: 3/4 cup corn syrup, reduce liquid by 2 Tbsp. for each cup replaced and lower oven temperature by 25 degrees F.

11. COCONUT SUGAR

1 cup: 720 calories

Science Says: Made from coconut nectar, it's low on the glycemic index. But because it's so new, there's very limited research available.

Best for: Using as you would use brown sugar. Has a nutty flavor, but does not taste like coconut.

To Use in Baking: For 1 cup sugar use: 1 cup coconut sugar.

12. CANE SYRUP (also called golden, refinery or refiner's syrup)

1 cup: 960 calories

Science Says: Made from boiled-down sugarcane, cane syrup is about 50/50 fructose and glucose.

Best for: Lightly sweetening iced tea and cocktails, as well as coffee cakes and biscuits. Has a nice, mellow caramel flavor and is a good vegan substitute for honey.

To Use in Baking: For 1 cup sugar use: 3/4 cup cane syrup, reduce liquid by 2 Tbsp. for each cup replaced and lower oven temperature by 25 degrees F.

(EatingWell is a magazine and website devoted to healthy eating as a way of life. Online at www.eatingwell.com.)



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