Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Nov 4, 2011 / 7 Mar-Cheshvan 5772

When conservatives fantasize

By Jack Kelly




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | If you look at President Barack Obama's job approval numbers and the "right track/wrong track" numbers, it's hard to see how he can win.

But if you look at the GOP candidates running against him, it's hard to see how Mr. Obama can lose.

The Seven Dwarves break down like this: There is former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney; five vying to be "Not Romney;" and Rep. Ron Paul, who inhabits a universe all his own.

(There are eight candidates, if you count former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman. I don't, since he seems to be running in the wrong party.)

Mitt Romney is a smart guy who's been very successful in business, and who wasn't as awful as Massachusetts governors customarily are. The pundits who told us last time what a swell president Barack Obama would be are telling us now that Mr. Romney's nomination is "inevitable."

But Mr. Romney rarely registers above 25 percent in the polls. Conservatives distrust him because he seems to change his position on issues almost as often as he changes his underwear.

Conservative concerns were not assuaged when it was reported Romneycare was the model for Obamacare; that Gov. Romney contemplated hiring environmentalist wacko John Holdren, currently Mr. Obama's science adviser; or when Mr. Romney first waffled, then flip-flopped on supporting Ohio Gov. John Kasich in his battle against public employee unions.

Others fret about the electability of Mr. Romney, who isn't the ideal candidate to run when so many are angry at Wall Street.

"He impresses, but he doesn't inspire or connect," said National Review Editor Rich Lowry. "There's a human element that was missing in 2008 and still is."

A "recidivist reviser of his principles," Mr. Romney "is not only becoming less electable, he might damage GOP chances of capturing the Senate," said columnist George Will.

Mr. Romney's nomination may still be inevitable, because the "Not Romneys" are so weak. First Rep.Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, then Texas Gov. Rick Perry soared like eagles, then plummeted like stones.

The latest is businessman Herman Cain. A spellbinding orator and the most likeable of the candidates, Mr. Cain made many conservative hearts flutter, including mine. But once in the spotlight, he demonstrated an appalling ignorance of foreign affairs, and said remarkably stupid things about abortion, border fences, and his willingness to trade all the prisoners at Gitmo for a single American soldier.

If Mr. Cain falters, as the pundits expect, the next Not Romney up to bat will be former House Speaker Newt Gingrich. The best debater, he has lots of political experience -- and more baggage than Amtrak. Ron Paul polls better against Mr. Obama than he does.

No candidate can be perfect, or close to it. But the best we can hope for from this bunch is mediocre. "Dreadful" is a distinct possibility.

Dismayed by this ugly reality, conservatives fantasize. Some convince themselves Mr. Romney is more conservative, more principled and more electable than the evidence suggests. Others imagine Gov. Perry is smarter than he appears, or that Herman Cain is qualified to be president. But there is no Wizard of Oz to give Mitt Romney a spine, or Rick Perry a brain.

The irony is we must choose from this mediocre (at best) field at a time when the Republican bench is filled with intelligent, articulate, principled conservatives who've displayed courage and initiative in office.

At the Heritage Foundation, Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin said the things the GOP presidential candidates should be saying, but aren't. His speech was one of the best philosophical defenses of conservativism they'd ever heard, said radio talk show hosts Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity. Mr. Ryan "is the biggest, thorniest burr in Barack Obama's saddle," said blogger Ryan Streeter.

But Rep. Ryan isn't running for president. Nor are Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, or South Carolina Sen. Jim DeMint.

These conservatives revere, but do not emulate our Founding Fathers, who risked financial ruin, imprisonment and death to win us our freedom. If Barack Obama is re-elected, and the republic the Founders gave us is lost forever, the blame will rest mostly with the A list conservatives who, when their country called, let the phone ring.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

Comment by clicking here.

JWR contributor Jack Kelly, a former Marine and Green Beret, was a deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force in the Reagan administration.

Jack Kelly Archives


© 2011, Jack Kelly

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles