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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Nov 24, 2011 / 27 Mar-Cheshvan 5772

Obama has most to fear from Huntsman

By Ann McFeatters




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | If Jon Huntsman were the GOP presidential nominee, President Barack Obama probably would be moving back to Chicago in January 2013.

With the advantage from Republicans' perspective that he's not Obama, Huntsman appeals to many independents because he's not a tea partier. And, once again, independents will decide the election.

Like Mitt Romney, Huntsman is a successful businessman and a former governor.

Like Newt Gingrich, Huntsman has been out of the country, although while Gingrich favors cruises around the Greek isles, Huntsman has lived abroad.

Like Rick Perry and Herman Cain, Huntsman has a sense of humor although he hasn't been as humorously gaffe prone.

Like Michele Bachmann, Huntsman loves children. Bachmann has five of her own and hosted 23 foster children, and Huntsman has seven children, including one adopted from China and one from India.

Like Ron Paul, Huntsman is worried about the United States getting into war after war after war.

Like Rick Santorum, well, no, Huntsman is a conservative but nowhere near that dogmatic.

Huntsman not only speaks Mandarin Chinese but Taiwanese Hokkein, learned as a young Mormon missionary. He was ambassador to Singapore, and U.S. trade ambassador under President George W. Bush. As Obama's former ambassador to China, Huntsman understands China's importance. For some, however, his service there under Obama makes him a traitor to Republicans while some Democrats think he is disloyal to Obama for now attacking his former boss.

At the 11th GOP debate (are we having fun yet?), the topic was national security. Huntsman alone made the point that foreign policy must be considered in the light of America's economic woes.

As Gingrich was calling for regime change in Iran by bombing Iran's refinery and preventing Iran from getting gasoline, Huntsman was calling for common sense. (One wonders if Gingrich has any idea how large Iran is.)

At the debate, Huntsman argued against keeping 100,000 American troops in Afghanistan, warning about the perils of nation building and the need to rebuild America. America needs to realize the sacrifices we've made there, he said. Romney said the U.S. military has to stay to prevent Afghanistan from becoming a refuge for terrorists. (One wonders how long this would be and how Romney would propose to pay for it.)

Hurrah for Huntsman pointing out to Romney that the president can't just listen to the country's generals (remember Vietnam, he said) but has to be the commander in chief with ideas and goals of his own.

Hurrah for Huntsman warning Gingrich, who wants to strengthen the Patriot Act at the expense of civil liberties, that Americans must be "very careful" to protect civil liberties. America must not lose its "shining brand."

Hurrah for Huntsman who says that we can't have banks that are too big to fail.

Obama has good credentials on foreign policy; his administration killed Osama bin Laden and helped bring down Moammar Gadhafi. But for many voters, it will be hard to get past 9 percent unemployment. It may not be fair, but the president gets the credit when the economy is good and the blame when it is bad.

At 2 percent in the polls, Huntsman so far is not resonating nationally in this race. He has put all his eggs in one basket -- New Hampshire. If he wins there -- a formidable challenge because Romney was governor of a neighboring state -- Huntsman then becomes a plausible contender for the nomination.

Huntsman's dilemma was laid bare on Saturday Night Live, when Seth Meyers said he would say something Americans never hear in the debates: "Governor Huntsman, the first question is for you."

Huntsman's hope is that after everyone else in the race has been frontrunner for a few minutes, he'll get his turn too.

But winning still is about organization and money. And although Huntsman's father is a billionaire, so far campaign donations are not flowing into Huntsman's coffers as they are into Romney's.

If Romney is the nominee, there is a 50-50 chance that Obama will be reelected.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

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Previously:


10/04/11: Romney looks like ‘The One’
09/28/11: At last some good news on energy
09/21/11: Time to make pols squirm
08/29/11: America still shows the power of the individual
08/17/11: Like us, Lady Liberty in disrepair, but still strong




© 2011, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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