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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Sept. 30, 2013/ 26 Tishrei, 5774

Congress Should Cut Food Stamp Program

By Debra J. Saunders

Debra J. Saunders



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | When House Republicans voted to cut the food stamp program by $39 billion over the next decade, Democrats charged GOP cruelty. Strategist Donna Brazile wrote that the move was a "heartless act," not "an example of government tightening its belt or making tough choices."

In fact, the proposed cut presents a classic example of government belt tightening. Enrollment in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program has grown by 70 percent since 2008; 48 million Americans were enrolled in the program in December. With the economy improving and unemployment shrinking, program participation should be falling, but it remains at an all-time high. The Congressional Budget Office expects food stamp enrollment to continue to rise through 2014.

That's how big government keeps getting bigger; welfare usage increases when the economy is bad, and then it increases when the economy improves.

Program boosters contend that the growth in food stamp participation is simply a function of the 2008 recession and a weak recovery. True, but also Congress loosened standards for eligibility so that able-bodied adults without children were able to skirt work requirements, and others qualified simply because they qualified for other welfare benefits.

Economists Peter Ganong and Jeffrey B. Liebman studied SNAP and found that two-thirds of the increase in enrollment was a function of unemployment, while SNAP spending is 6 percent higher because of eligibility changes instituted in 2008.

The result: hipsters who shop with their EBT cards at Whole Foods and — in some states, including California — fast-food joints. Clearly, these folks aren't truly needy; otherwise, they'd be shopping where their dollars — well, other people's dollars — go furthest.

Then there's Washington's commitment to "outreach." Months ago, Portland State University professor Garrison Greenwood alerted me to college websites that encourage students to enroll in SNAP. "College is stressful and expensive," one community college tells students. "Don't let food be another financial worry."

"I'm curious," Greenwood wrote. "How many people are aware full-time college students may qualify for food stamps?"

You get the feeling that Washington invites college students to apply for food stamps in an attempt to normalize usage so that even people who don't really need welfare sign up anyway.

Thus, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor is right to assert that it is wrong to make working people pay for food stamps for able-bodied adults who don't really need them. Cantor supports a "safety net," he told Fox News, but it's not fair to ask working Americans to subsidize the rising tide of welfare "dependency."

The GOP calls for a return to work requirements, wrote the libertarian-leaning Cato Institute's Michael D. Tanner, because "work is the key to getting out of poverty."

Even with these "heartless" cuts, Tanner computed, annual SNAP spending would "be almost $73.5 billion, which is more than $5 billion more than outlays were in 2010." From that, I deduce that either President Barack Obama and the Democratic-controlled Congress were heartless in 2010 or House Republicans are not heartless today.

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© 2013, Creators Syndicate

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