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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 29, 2013/ 25 Mar-Cheshvan, 5774

ObamaCare's false promise

By Rich Lowry




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | To say that President Barack Obama is on the record telling Americans they can keep their current health insurance is an understatement. He repeated the assurance so many times during the health-care debate that it was almost a verbal tic.

He was stirring: "Americans must have the freedom to keep whatever doctor and health-care plan they have." He was adamant: "If you like your health plan, you will be able to keep your health-care plan. Period." He was clear: "Let me be clear: If you like your doctor or health-care provider, you can keep them. If you like your health-care plan, you can keep that, too."

He had to keep repeating his promise, since there was so much bad information out there. "No matter what you've heard," he said in a weekly radio address in August 2009, "if you like your doctor or health-care plan, you can keep it."

Practically no Obama speech was complete without this disclaimer. He must have felt sorely tempted to tack it on to his Cairo speech to the Arab world and his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. It must have been the first words on his lips when he arose in the morning and the last when he retired in the evening. When it came to existing health insurance, he portrayed himself as the principled and tireless defender of the realm.

Rarely has a major domestic program been sold on the basis of a premise so patently untrue. No matter what you've heard from the president of the United States, hundreds of thousands of people in states around the country are now receiving notices that their insurance is getting canceled. It raises the question of how the president could be so wrong about a basic element of his own signature initiative.

President Obama could always go with the Huey Long defense. In one of his gubernatorial campaigns in Louisiana, Long promised a state senator a bridge project in exchange for an endorsement. Upon getting elected, he reneged on his pledge. Asked by the jilted state senator what he should tell his disappointed constituents, Long advised: "Tell them I lied."



Until now, Obama hasn't been pressed to square what he said with the reality of those cancellation notices. But the dam is breaking. Former adviser David Axelrod has refined the Obama promise to say that "most" people can keep their insurance, which doesn't have quite the same ring as the president's sweeping statements of yore. White House spokesman Jay Carney conceded under questioning that some plans are being axed.

It may be true, per Axelrod, that "most" people with insurance in the country are keeping it, but "most" people in the individual market are losing it. Robert Laszewski of the consultancy Health Policy and Strategy Associates estimates that 19 million people are covered in the individual market and 16 million of them have plans that don't pass muster under the exacting new Obamacare rules.

This is a problem of a different order than the travails of healthcare.gov. The website will presumably get fixed; its failures are a bug, not a feature. Throwing people off old plans, in contrast, is central to Obamacare's remaking of American health insurance. Carney justified the cancellations as the shedding of "substandard" policies, by which he means policies that are more affordable and less comprehensive than allowed under the law.

Many of the people who found that those policies suited them will now be forced to buy different, more expensive policies. Sen. Ron Johnson, a Wisconsin Republican, is planning to offer legislation grandfathering those plans so people can really keep them. Johnson's bill would force Democrats to choose between defending the law and standing by Obama's frequently repeated promise. They will, of course, choose the law.

The line about how "Americans must have the freedom to keep whatever doctor and health-care plan they have" isn't operative, and never was.

Welcome to Obamacare.

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© 2012 King Features Syndicate

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