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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 1, 2013/ 27 Tishrei, 5774

The intransigents

By Rich Lowry




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Refusing to negotiate is the new reasonableness.

After years of agonized media commentary about the failure of key players in Washington to sit down and work out their differences, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid plans to win the fight over the government shutdown by rejecting all compromise, calling his opponents names and escaping blame in the press.

Eric Cantor, do not try this at home. It is a gambit available only to a Democrat who is presumed, almost by definition, to be free of any responsibility for a shutdown. Reid could attack John Boehner with his bare hands and it would barely budge the narrative of his role as one of the outraged innocents in this story.

President Barack Obama finally invited congressional leaders to the White House to discuss what is supposed to be a dire national crisis, but it is Reid’s calculated intransigence that has so far carried the day. According to POLITICO, it was on his advice that Obama pulled the plug on a prior planned gathering at the White House. The president says he won’t negotiate on the debt ceiling, so the current fight that Democrats won’t negotiate over might roll into the next one they won’t negotiate over, either.

The basis of the refusal to talk is the notion that only an extremist with a bomb strapped to his chest would make a policy demand as government funding is about to run out. This argument depends on a short memory. Before Republicans lost the shutdown fights with Bill Clinton in the mid-1990s, putting an end to such brinkmanship for the duration, the policy dispute on the cusp of a shutdown was a routine feature of Washington.

What is supposed to be the Golden Age of bipartisanship in Washington, when Tip O’Neill and Ronald Reagan were bosom buddies and practically tucked each other in at night, was punctuated by periodic shutdowns. As Dylan Matthews of The Washington Post’s Wonkblog points out in a comprehensive account, the deadlocks of the 1980s involved budget cuts, public-works spending, the MX missile, welfare, foreign aid, a civil rights ruling by the Supreme Court, a buy- and hire-American requirement for offshore oil rigs, and funding for the Nicaraguan Contras — a broad cross section of the controversies of the time.



The fact checker at the Post, Glenn Kessler, has batted down Obama’s contention that no one has ever tried to attach extraneous measures to a debt ceiling measure before. As far back as 1973, Sens. Teddy Kennedy and Walter Mondale (aka nihilistic terrorists heedless of the damage they might cause to global financial markets) tried to attach campaign finance reform to a debt-limit increase. Kessler cites an evaluation of the Golden Age by two experts who “list 25 nongermane amendments that were attached to debt-limit bills between 1978 and 1987, including allowing voluntary school prayer, banning busing to achieve integration and proposing a nuclear freeze.”

And why not? Friction between the executive and legislative branches is built into our system, and it is the nature of politics that both sides will seek to exploit whatever leverage they have. Obama didn’t hesitate to use the impending fiscal cliff at the end of 2012 to force as big a tax increase he could reasonably get. Nonetheless, the latest standoff is portrayed as the ruination of our politics. New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, taking a break from his occasional fantasizing about a brief bout of Chinese-style dictatorship, thinks “our democracy is imperiled.”

The real problem with the Republican position isn’t that it is unprecedented or inherently out of bounds but that is unlikely to achieve much. To put it mildly, the Republican handling of the continuing resolution has lacked the forethought traditionally associated with successful strategy. Republicans are now on their third version of the continuing resolution. Defunding is so last Tuesday. They have bid themselves down to a delay of the individual mandate and imposing Obamacare on Congress.

Every indication is that Reid welcomed a shutdown on the assumption that Republicans could be made to pay the price. It’s not a bad bet, but the risk to Democrats is that they make their eagerness to press their partisan advantage too blatant. If the shutdown is so dire, presumably they should want to talk about how to resolve it. If the temporary suspension of specific government functions — the parks, services to veterans — is so harmful, presumably they should welcome Republican bills to restore them.

Unless Republicans suffer a catastrophic defeat over the continuing resolution, the Democratic opposition to negotiation won’t be sustainable over the longer term. The president is willing — nay, eager — to negotiate with an Iran regime that has American blood on its hands. He’ll talk to it about its nuclear program that he says is flatly unacceptable, even though it is safe to assume that the Iranians aren’t acting in good faith.

Republicans who oppose his health care law, though, are beyond the pale and not worth seriously engaging over the debt ceiling. And they are the unreasonable ones?

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