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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 10, 2012/ 24 Tishrei, 5773

Even in SF, There Is No Free Naked Lunch

By Debra J. Saunders

Debra J. Saunders



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The news release headline reads, "Supervisor Wiener to introduce legislation restricting public nudity to appropriate venues." That's San Francisco City Hall-speak for: The city is getting ready to ban public nudity, but not from the Folsom Street Fair or other public venues where nudity has been known to make cameo appearances.

If the San Francisco Board of Supervisors actually does ban public nudity, it will do so after so much hand-wringing you would think the supes had been handcuffed to reality and forced to stare at too much sagging skin.

I feel for Scott Wiener — who was elected in 2010, just as The Castro turned "clothing-optional." During the election, the supervisor told me, public nudity wasn't an issue. You'd see the odd naked person here and there, but nobody cared.

In the past two years, however, nudity has devolved into a quality-of-life issue. Naked guys turn up daily at Jane Warner Plaza to plop their tenders in public places. On weekends, you may see gangs of nude folk riding bikes or walking in packs along the Embarcadero. If so, you do not think, "La dolce vita."

The three words that come to mind are: Too much information.

Last year, Wiener heeded constituents' mounting complaints about naked men on public benches and unclad adults dining not only alfresco but also au naturel. Wiener introduced an ordinance to require that nudists place some kind of cloth between their buttocks and their seating. The napkin lobby dared not protest.

Wiener did not dare propose a ban on public nudity. "San Francisco is a liberal and tolerant city," quoth Wiener in a statement at the time, "and we pride ourselves on the fact."

Alas, with the Wiener ordinance in place, there are more birthday suits than ever. "We've always had our nude people, one or two," resident Dennis Richards told me. "Now we have 10 or 12" or even 15. There are so many that you cannot avoid seeing privates in public.

"I don't even own a bathing suit," Richards told me. He goes to nude beaches, where people know what they're going to see, or maybe soaks up some rays in his backyard. "But I at least have the common sense that I do it where it's supposed to be done."

"I fought for gay rights," Richards, a vice president for Salesforce.com, lamented. "This is not what I fought for."

"I didn't want to have to go here," Wiener told me. "This isn't the area I want to be legislating." He rather would pass housing or public transportation bills. But:

"This is a city where people live, work and raise families," Wiener noted. There's an elementary school just blocks from the plaza. "It's not a gigantic nudist paradise."

Both Wiener and Richards blame out-of-towners for coming to the Special City to go bald. The problem, noted Wiener, is that these stark-naked tourists are "undermining the neighborhood."

Thus, a city that prides itself for its tolerance must find a way to police those who visually assault fellow citizens without prior consent.

One naked guy may be a nuisance, but too much nudity begets too much crudity. It degrades the social fabric. For San Francisco's political class, you might say, stark-naked people have become the new pothole.

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© 2012, Creators Syndicate

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