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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct 12, 2011 14 Tishrei, 5772

GOP debate is wicked

By Roger Simon




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The Republican race has turned into "The Wizard of Oz." Rick Perry wants a brain. Mitt Romney wants a heart. And any number of candidates are Dorothy, realizing there is no place like home and they should have stayed there.

Herman Cain is seeking courage. He needs the courage to face the fact he is never going to be the Republican nominee, no matter how well he does in the polls. He needs the courage to settle for something far better than the presidency: His own show on Fox.

They all march down the yellow brick road that leads not from rally to rally or, heaven forbid, voter to voter, but from debate to debate, like the one held Tuesday at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H. All the candidates were seated and co-moderator Charlie Rose described the setting as a "kitchen table."

But if it had been my kitchen table growing up, I would have left home.

Ostensibly devoted to the topic of economics, the debate was instead devoted to sniping and one-liners and familiar regurgitations from the candidates' briefing books. If it is possible to hold a debate and have nobody win, this was it.

But, once again, Romney didn't lose, which makes him the same thing as a winner. If he could only find a heart. He seems like someone who plays a president on TV, not someone who really yearns for the job. If you put your ear to his chest, would you hear the lub-dub, lub-dub of a warm human heart or the whirr and click of a cold, calculating machine?

As usual, he had his lines down: "The answer is to cut federal spending. The second part of the answer is to get our economy to grow. Get Americans back to work and paying taxes. I think it's a terrible idea to cut defense. I think it's a terrible idea to raise taxes."

Whirr. Click.

Rick Perry, who blamed his past poor debate performances on being "tired," will have to come up with a new excuse for why he cannot find his brain. Tuesday night, he didn't look like he needed sleep, but caffeine. In reality, he is probably brighter than his predecessor as governor of Texas, George W. Bush (who nonetheless managed to get through eight years in the White House). But Perry simply cannot show it.

Visibly nervous, he stumbled from answer to answer, and even his rehearsed lines seemed defensive and prickly. "Mitt's had six years to work on a plan," Perry grumped. "I've been at this about eight weeks."

Pray for another eight weeks, governor.

And then there were the lions and tigers and bears.

Michele Bachmann, a former flavor of the -week, came armed with one-liners. She hit Herman Cain's trademark 9-9-9- tax plan, hoping to pick up conservative - and mystical - voters. "Take 9-9-9 and turn it upside down," Bachmann said. "The devil is in the details."

The audience, which is to be commended for never cheering once for death, heard that reference to the sign of the devil and went, "Oooooo."

(Go ahead and call Bachmann the Wicked Witch of the West. I'm not going to risk it. Someone might try to throw a bucket of water on her.) Rick Santorum said at one point: "I want to go to war with China." He was talking about an economic war. I think.

Jon Huntsman, moderate, reasonable and therefore un-nominatable in the Republican Party, reduced himself to low comedy. "I would respectfully disagree with Rick Santorum; Pennsylvania is not the gas capital of the country," Huntsman said. "Washington, D.C., is the gas capital of the country."

He then waited for the guffaws that never came.

It went on for 90 grueling minutes, with each candidate elbowing the others around the table. "I'm still speaking! I'm still speaking! I'm still speaking!" Romney said at one point.

Which allows me to bring this extended metaphor to a close with a very famous and very apt exchange.

Dorothy: "How do you talk if you don't have a brain?"

Scarecrow: "Well, some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't they?"

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