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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct 4, 2011 / 7 Tishrei, 5772

Has San Francisco really gone to the other type of birds?

By Debra J. Saunders

Debra J. Saunders



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Does San Francisco have a serious problem with birds flying into tall buildings? Was there a good reason the Board of Supervisors unanimously passed a "bird-safe" building ordinance last month? I asked Supervisors David Chiu and John Avalos on Saturday why they supported the measure, at a mayoral candidates debate hosted by the West of Twin Peaks Central Council. Their answers were instructive.

Chiu seemed put out that he had been asked such a trivial question. The board has spent about "40 seconds" on the measure, he assured me, less time than during Saturday's debate. Avalos answered that he knows the city has a problem; he has seen lots of dead birds on top of City Hall. (Insert your own joke here.)

Be it noted, City Hall is a historical building and exempt from the law. The ordinance sits on the mayor's desk.

Here's the problem: The less important an issue is to the quality of life in the city the more the supes are inclined to do something about it. If there is no need for a law, then City Hall will pass it.

I read the ordinance. It reads like the book report you wrote when you didn't read the book. There is no research cited that establishes a rash of birds flying into commercial buildings in San Francisco, just the sort of vanilla language you'd expect from a do-gooder who smells an easy issue.

As in: "Studies have determined that annual bird fatalities in North America from window collisions may be as high as 1 billion birds per year and that building collisions are a threat of significant magnitude to affect the viability of bird populations, leading to local, regional and national declines."

And: "Building owners have noted bird strikes at San Francisco buildings." _That's it.

Richard Drechsler is a bird-watcher and wildlife hospital volunteer who opposed the measure.

In a series of letters to the supervisors, Drechsler explained that there is no research supporting the need for a law in San Francisco, where weather patterns are different from those in New York, Chicago and Toronto (where studies actually were conducted). He monitors 4 acres where 250 dead birds are found each year. "I have photographs of their bodies," Drechsler wrote. "Not a single one of these birds died as a result of colliding with a building."

"I care about birds," Drechsler told me, "but I want their plight to be understood accurately."

What about the cost to businesses and developers forced to install windows with "bird-safe glazing treatment"? Margie O'Driscoll, executive director of the American Institute of Architects' San Francisco chapter, told USA Today that bird safety features can double the cost of windows and reduce energy efficiency.

No surprise, there is no mention of cost in the statute language. After all, for City Hall pols, it's a freebie. Oppose the measure and risk appearing heartless about birds.

O'Driscoll described the ordinance as "more aspirational than scientific." That's a kind depiction of the supes' unwavering aspiration to frame themselves as leaders in any trendy cause. They want so much to do good that they can't wait to find out whether there is a real problem.

Drechsler sighed, "I just hope it doesn't do birds harm."

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© 2011, Creators Syndicate

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