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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct 7, 2011 / 9 Tishrei, 5772

Apple's iPhone 4S: Buy or Wait?

By Mark Kellner



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | It wasn't exactly equal to the "Great Disappointment" of October 23, 1844, when followers of lay Baptist preacher William Miller awoke to the bitter fact that a prophesied return of Jesus Christ to the Earth didn't materialize. But Tuesday's Apple Inc. news conference, which launched a rather improved iPhone 4 model, the iPhone 4S, apparently was a similar letdown to a number of consumers and industry pundits.

Where is the bigger display screen? What about a thinner phone? And a number - we want a new number!

Sigh. While a new, nearly inconceivable iPhone model that was thinner, had a larger screen and perhaps also found you the best parking spot at the mall would be something to cheer about, the plain fact of the matter is that phone isn't here. It's not on the horizon. And, like the groundswell for one or another non-candidate to enter the 2012 Republican presidential nominating scrum, not much evidence has been produced either.

Have you seen, or held, an iPhone 5? I haven't, and I don't know anyone who has.

This being the case, consumers have to decide what, if anything, to do with this new model. Your columnist has not seen or held one of the new iPhone 4S models yet, and while I hope to review one, my observations here are based in part on what Apple is promising, as well as on past experience with the iPhone.

The promise: a faster, more powerful processing chip; a better still-photo camera producing 8 Megapixel images; and full 1080p High Definition video, with image stabilization. Oh, and now the maximum storage is 64 Gigabytes, a rather incredible amount when you think about it. More promise: Siri, a "personal assistant" program that'll answer spoken questions and perhaps let you dictate e-mail replies while on the run.

For many of us, these improvements alone will be worth the upgrade. Again, we just don't know when - or if - an "iPhone 5" is coming. It could be next week, but is more likely to be sometime next year. And thereby hangs a decision point, I believe.

Some of us buy and use smartphones for convenience and enjoyment. That's fine, of course, and if you're not dependent upon a smartphone for your livelihood, you can perhaps be a bit more casual in what you select and when you buy it.

But most of us, I suspect, use our smartphones for business and work-related tasks. Whether it's President Obama with his specially encrypted BlackBerry, or the neighborhood realtor seeking to pair a young couple with their first home, smartphones assume more importance than just being another way to play Sudoku.

Four years into the iPhone era, I have yet to see any other platform come close to Apple's overall quality, applications reliability (and variety), and sheer elegance. The latter may be in the eye of the beholder, but the vast numbers of iPhones sold makes this a safe statement, in my opinion.

Should iPhone 4 users upgrade? Absent a unit to review, I can't say definitively. But if the device performs as advertised, particularly on the picture- and video-taking end, it's going to be mighty tempting.

The "Siri" program, apparently, will need the new dual-core processor in the iPhone 4S to work. Fair enough, I suppose. This, too, will be a great motivator. I was wrong when I said, on WTTG-TV on Tuesday, that Siri will let you command the phone hands-free: you must press a microphone button to get things going. But software to modify that will be available from other developers. And even with the button-press requirement, the idea that you can ask your phone for a weather or stock update and have it "answer" you is relatively awesome.

There is one other group of people who should rejoice at the new iPhone announcement, even if it wasn't the "5" for which they'd hoped. These are the customers and shareholders of Sprint/Nextel, which until now has been absent in the iPhone game. Such a hole in the Sprint product lineup has hurt the firm, executives there say, and having bridged the gap, particularly with an iPhone that can work on Sprint's CDMA system as well as the rest of the world's GSM networks, is a huge plus.

Meanwhile, all iPhone users will be able to get their hands on the new iOS 5, the operating system for iPhones and iPads, next week. That should provide enough merriment to make even a wait for a hardware upgrade tolerable.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Mark Kellner has reported on technology for industry newspapers and magazines since 1983, and has been the computer columnist for The Washington Times since 1991.Comment by clicking here.

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© 2011, News World Communications, Inc. Reprinted with permission of The Washington Times. Visit the paper at http://www.washingtontimes.com

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