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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct 17, 2011 / 19 Tishrei, 5772

Social Security's grave mistakes

By Dale McFeatters




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | There's an expression in Washington about politicians and agencies that find themselves in hot water: It's not the crime, it's the cover-up.

In the case of the Social Security Administration's massive breach of confidentiality, it wasn't a crime, but incompetence, and not so much a cover-up as total inaction by the agency.

SSA failed to inform tens of thousands of Americans that during the past 20 years their names, addresses, birth dates and Social Security numbers had inadvertently been released to a publicly available database widely used by business.

The agency's failure to inform the at-risk parties ignored government guidelines and recommendations for dealing with security breaches and violates the intent, if not the letter, of the U.S. Privacy Act.

The database is called the Death Master File and contains the records of 90 million dead Americans; it was begun in large part at the urging of business. Administered properly, the death file is a useful tool in preventing con artists from assuming the identities of deceased Americans.

The problem is that each year the names and other personal information of 14,000 living Americans are mistakenly entered in the file. Since the SSA declines to issue warnings, the first inkling many Americans have of the release of their private information is when they become victims of identity theft.

An earlier examination by Scripps Howard News Service found that 31,931 names of living Americans had become public. A later, more intensive examination with the aid of the television stations and other newspapers of the parent E.W. Scripps Co. found that the problem was significantly broader, but still unaddressed by the Social Security Administration.

Most citizens contacted for this story only found out about the breach when they were suddenly confronted by frozen bank accounts, canceled cellphone service, denied apartment leases, turned down for credit cards or refused mortgages and student loans.

The businesses, landlords and prospective employers were acting on the not-unfounded belief that since the master file showed the applicants were dead they were being set up for some kind of identity-fraud scam.

It took one victim nearly 10 years to untangle the mess and, she complained, "No one ever sent me an apology or anything." Being the SSA means never having to say you're sorry -- or much of anything else.

SSA has refused repeated requests by us to explain its policy of keeping silent about the breaches or its policy of notifying -- or not -- the potential victims, which prevents people from taking action to protect themselves from the lapses.

Forty-six states make disclosure of confidentiality breaches mandatory for state and local agencies. The White House Office of Management and Budget has urged a federal policy of public admission and individual notification. Clearly, Congress should make that policy mandatory, too.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

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Previously:

10/12/11 NASA's help-wanted sign for astronauts

10/10/11 Saving Thomas Jefferson''s chimneys

10/06/11 Uncle Sam's answer to deadbeats --- robo-calls

10/04/11 Christie should ignore jibes on his weight

10/03/11 Iran says its warships will head for Jersey shore

09/29/11 Europeans bristle at Obama's lectures

09/28/11 Jessica Rabbit for the defense

09/27/11 Russia learns outcome of next March's presidential election

09/26/11 Another try at leaving no child behind

09/23/11 This generation needs a job more than a name

09/22/11 In the lane next to you: A driverless car

09/20/11 Cloudy, cool, chance of falling satellite

09/14/11 Humanitarian extortion

09/13/11 Paging Dr. Watson; he's there in 3 seconds

09/09/11 Forecasting 100 percent chance of heavy metal

09/08/11 A jobs program at Obama's doorstep

09/07/11 Iran's government afraid of the water

09/06/11 Congress returns, tanned, rested and testy

09/05/11 Space nations must clean up after themselves

09/02/11 Osama bin Laden died a failure and he knew it

09/01/11 Time to retire political pie in the face

08/31/11 Labor Day celebrates what, exactly?

08/30/11 These arrestees really are framed

08/25/11 When in an earthquake, block traffic

08/23/11 A case for discretion in deportation arrests

08/22/11 Tough times or not, parents shell out for school

08/18/11 Being unpleasant for fun, profit, promotion

08/17/11 Time to prepare for the end game in Libya

08/16/11: ‘Super Committee’ starts facing reality

08/15/11: World's fastest plane disappears even faster

08/12/11: British cops track rioters through security cameras

08/11/11: Relax. There is no Death Star

08/10/11: House pages run final errands

08/09/11: U.S. treading water on job creation

08/08/11: Uncle Sam, the world's permanent guest

08/05/11: Most 9/11 victims not on federal death records

08/04/11: Russian PM calls U.S. a ‘parasite.’ He should be so lucky

08/03/11: Congress goes from one bind to another

08/02/11: D.B. Cooper may no longer be a mystery

08/01/11: Libya's latest weapon against NATO --- lawsuits

07/29/11: He'll always be known as Hot Wheels Handler

07/25/11: Recruiting children to save a dying town

07/22/11: Bachmann's admirable medical candor

07/12/11: Social Security's grave mistakes

07/08/11: Debt crisis need not be constitutional crisis

07/07/11: Startups entice new talent with kickball, treehouses

07/05/11: Stranded tourists get rare treat

06/30/11: The dollar Americans refuse to spend

06/27/11: The hangman doesn't cometh





© 2011, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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